Film & TV

Sneak from Interview Magazine’s February Cover: Red Hot Eddie Redmayne

Film & TV

Sneak from Interview Magazine’s February Cover: Red Hot Eddie Redmayne

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Eddie Redmayne is having a pretty awesome week. The young British actor snagged the Golden Globe for Best Actor in a Motion Picture Drama, beating out Steve Carrell who transformed into that creepy looking wrestling coach in Foxcatcher, and Jake Gyllenhaal who also went full on creepy-stalker-skeletor for his performance in Nightcrawler. (Don’t worry ladies and gents Gyllenhaal is back to looking his usual hot self, and Steve Carrell is no longer creepy…ish.)

Over the years Redmayne has gained a following of his own, since My Week with Marilyn and Les Miserable he has held his own in the acting, looks, and singing department. I guess he qualifies as a triple-threat. But his performance in The Theory of Everything, where he portrays Stephen Hawking, is his most note worthy role on his acting resume. Not only does he have a Golden Globe under his belt, he’s also Interview Magazine’s February cover star, in discussion with one J-Law. Photographed by Craig McDean and styled by Karl Templer, the images show a darker sexier side of Redmayne, taking him from prim and proper Brit boy you would want to take home to your mum, to sexy bad ass 0- 100 real quick. Unlucky for us, and yes that was my attempt at British jargon, Redmayne is very much not single and off the market. Interview’s February Issue comes out tomorrow, but here are some snippets from Red Hot Redmayne’s story. SPOILER ALERT: home boy likes to play the piano, read books, watch the Real Housewives and his favorite cuisine is sushi. “Stars…they’re just like us”

ON FEAR:

“I’m just one gigantic ball of rancid fear and self-consciousness. I’m entirely fueled by fear.”

ON STEPHEN HAWKING:

“Stephen is just effortlessly cool. He has this kind of shambolic confidence to him.”

ON TIME OFF:

“What do I do? I don’t know. I’m really shit at the piano. I play the piano. I occasionally try to pretend to paint, again, badly. But this is the great luxury of not working: the moment you read a book that has nothing to do with work, you know you’re really relaxed.”