Art & Design

@benisright Illustrates All of Our Favorite Vices: Kinky Sex & Junk Food

Art & Design

@benisright Illustrates All of Our Favorite Vices: Kinky Sex & Junk Food

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Every Friday, BULLETT’s introducing our favorite Instagram profiles and getting to know the people behind the posts.

The art world has never been as honest about who we are behind closed doors as it is today. While the band of European artists we learned about in art history 101 happily painted vanilla sex scenes and photographed classy nude women, we’ve never seen work as confrontational about what people are actually into as we do now, scrolling through our Instagrams.

And as sex has become more readily available on our feeds, kink and gender nonconformity have basically become the standard. Artist Ben Evans is immersing himself in the movement for the sake of normalizing once-unconventional looks and desires. With androgyny and neon vices, his paintings are 2017 in every way––from the omnipresent leg hair, to the spandex costumes repurposed as hip decor, his poppy work brings our humanity to light with a grotesque twist. For inspiration, the 22-year-old scours real estate websites for weird home interiors, and designs surreal scenes by imagining what went down in the rooms he finds. In his mind, that means junk food, bondage and a lot of weed––which is definitely  what’s happening in Brooklyn, somewhere in your building.


whats for dessert ?

A post shared by ben (@benisright) on


Name: Ben Evans

Instagram: @benisright

Occupation: Student

Favorite Profiles to Follow: @van_minnen, @kliuwong, @loufratino

How did you get into the art you make now?

I’d been doing crude illustrations of weird interiors that I found really interesting, and posting those online. What I saw reaction-wise, were these grotesque and visceral opinions people had about it. So I really just pushed this surrealist imagery that incorporates lots of triggers. Then I started bringing in bubblegum colors that contrast the dark world I create.

What inspires the settings?

I started out by going on Zillow and Streeteasy, looking through interiors of houses and making up narratives for these places that I’d never been inside of before. So I was projecting my own gross ideas of the insides of these spaces, and how much people could have done in them. Whenever I’m in a car and I look outside at all the apartments, I think it’s so insane how many lives are lived.


home alone with the geeb

A post shared by ben (@benisright) on


What themes do you explore in your work?

I like creating figures that could really be anybody, and not pigeonhole-ing into one body type––I never want to project purported ideals onto what people are looking at.

What do you think of the Internet as a platform for art?

I was always hesitant to pursue digital art because being on a computer, and separate from the artist––it’s very much the opposite of fine art. But then I thought about how immediate it is, and how that lends itself to the culture we live in, and to the way we now exist with very short attention spans.

Is your work inspired specifically by the current time?

I get a lot of comments about how much weed is used in my art, but I use it more as a form of colloquialism and familiarity and as a bridge of our generation. I’m using things that are so common in our culture that make my art almost timestamped, so that it could have only been made in 2017. It’s a commentary on gender roles and how things can change now.

So you’re actually trying to avoid making your work timeless?

I hope one day maybe my works can become timeless, but I think right now, my art existing as a statue of the time we live in is super important. People have very polarizing reactions to my work––they either love it or hate it––and I think that division speaks to the time we live in. I think it’s important that the art of this time is representative of what’s happening right now.



What do you think about when you’re conceptualizing and working on a piece?

I always think about sin and things my parents would be upset with me for. A lot of times, I’m thinking about space and what we do behind closed doors, regardless of who we are and what our beliefs are––just how raw and intimate our lives are in a room where nobody can see what we’re doing.

What are the characters in your paintings thinking?

They’re numb––they don’t care whatsoever, because I never want to get a certain point across. You come with your own baggage and you find your own point in the piece.

How do sexuality and satire relate in your work?

Making it sarcastic and using vomit and numbed out people creates this weird atmosphere where it’s darkly comedic, but still remains sexual. And that pushes this visceral feeling. I always think poking fun at sex is really funny.

What do you want people to take away from your art?

I hope people can just project themselves in whatever way they want to into the work. I have my own baggage, but I think it’s super interesting to not reject any feedback on my art––that’s why I never like to project myself on it.