November 13, 2012
Madeleine Vionnet's introduces the bias cut and brings a new fluidity of movement to her Grecian designs, 1914.
Originally trained as a civil engineer, André Courrèges builds his 'Space Age' look of 1964 out of squares, trapezoids and triangles.
Roy Halston Frowick, a.k.a. Halston, designs fluid gowns for '70s disco dwellers as well as uniforms for flight attendants, the US Olympic team, the NYPD, and even the Girls Scouts.
Japanese designers Yohji Yamamoto, Issey Miyake and Rei Kawakubo of Comme des Garçons make gender ambiguous, minimalist, anti-fashion statements in the 1980s.
American minimalism: Calvin Klein circa 1986.
Material technology: Christy Turlington captured by Juergen Teller in Stephen Sprouse for the April 1994 issue of Vogue.
Mass refinement in Spring 1995 Calvin Klein.
Guinevere Van Seenus stars in the 1996 Jil Sander campaign by photographer Craig McDean.
Peter Lindbergh for Prada, 1996.
When Helmut Lang was designed by Helmut Lang: Spring 1997.
Kate Moss for Calvin Klein, 1997.
A new century: Natasha Poly in Jil Sander by Raf Simons. Shot by Willy Vanderperre in 2009.
In 2010, Matthew Ames reflects back on '80s Japanese avant-garde and American sportswear minimalisms. Photographer: Sybille Walter. Stylist: Samuel Drira.
Francisco Costa's vision for Calvin Klein, circa 2010. Model: Lara Stone. Photographers: Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott.
Modern minimalism: Céline by Phoebe Philo for Fall 2012 photographed by, who else, Juergen Teller.
Madeleine Vionnet's introduces the bias cut and brings a new fluidity of movement to her Grecian designs, 1914.
Originally trained as a civil engineer, André Courrèges builds his 'Space Age' look of 1964 out of squares, trapezoids and triangles.
Roy Halston Frowick, a.k.a. Halston, designs fluid gowns for '70s disco dwellers as well as uniforms for flight attendants, the US Olympic team, the NYPD, and even the Girls Scouts.
Japanese designers Yohji Yamamoto, Issey Miyake and Rei Kawakubo of Comme des Garçons make gender ambiguous, minimalist, anti-fashion statements in the 1980s.
American minimalism: Calvin Klein circa 1986.
Material technology: Christy Turlington captured by Juergen Teller in Stephen Sprouse for the April 1994 issue of Vogue.
Mass refinement in Spring 1995 Calvin Klein.
Guinevere Van Seenus stars in the 1996 Jil Sander campaign by photographer Craig McDean.
Peter Lindbergh for Prada, 1996.
When Helmut Lang was designed by Helmut Lang: Spring 1997.
Kate Moss for Calvin Klein, 1997.
A new century: Natasha Poly in Jil Sander by Raf Simons. Shot by Willy Vanderperre in 2009.
In 2010, Matthew Ames reflects back on '80s Japanese avant-garde and American sportswear minimalisms. Photographer: Sybille Walter. Stylist: Samuel Drira.
Francisco Costa's vision for Calvin Klein, circa 2010. Model: Lara Stone. Photographers: Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott.
Modern minimalism: Céline by Phoebe Philo for Fall 2012 photographed by, who else, Juergen Teller.

A new minimalism is here, the fashion bylines say. But what’s the old? Not simply simplicity, minimalism eliminates nonessentials, seeking a refinement of form dictated by function. Often involving technological innovation, the results may be simple but the execution is not. Here, we take a tour through moments of minimalisms past and show that minimalism is not a trend, but a philosophical constant.

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