Art & Design

Highlights from Gallery Weekend Berlin

Art & Design

Highlights from Gallery Weekend Berlin

Richard Philips, "Psychic Incantations II, 2005 " Mathew Gallery
Anne Collier, "Woman Crying," Galerie Neu
Wolfgang Tilmans, “Studio,” Galerie Buchholz
Jerry Hsu, “ A LOVE LIKE MINE IS HARD TO FIND,” HVW8 Gallery
Petra Cortright, Die Rose, Societe Berlin
Petra Cortright, “BUFFY_THE_VAMPIRE_SLAYERdj149du.exe, 2016,” Societe Gallery
Wolfgang Tillmans, “Studio,” Galerie Buchholz
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BULLETT hit the streets to explore the 12th annual Gallery Weekend Berlin.

For two days—and nights—each year, more than 50 galleries throughout Berlin open their doors to art fans and collectors from all over the world. We sorted through some of Berlin’s most progressive galleries that played part in the evolution of the city’s art scene.

 

Here are some of our highlights from the weekend:

 

Artist: Richard Phillips

Gallery: Mathew Gallery

Location: Schaperstrasse 12, 10719 Berlin

 

Richard Philips, "Psychic Incantations II, 2005 " Mathew Gallery
Richard Philips, “Psychic Incantations II, 2005 ” Mathew Gallery

 

“New Paintings” is a new body of work by Richard Philips. The exhibition follows up “Conversations,” his previous show at Mathew NYC earlier this year, in which the abstractions of Christopher Wool and Albert Oehlen were overlaid on commercially derived imagery.  Philip’s new paintings bring the conversation back to Berlin, engaging one of Germany’s most renowned painters: Gerhard Richter.

Using the pastiche of process-based abstraction and its antonym, hyper-realism, Philips’ new works attempt to revive the impact of both, and return these canonized styles to a place where the mechanism of their immanent value systems can be examined under the laboratory conditions of the gallery.

 

Artist: Anne Collier

Gallery: Galerie Neu

Location: Linienstrase 119 abc, 10115 Berlin

 

Anne Collier, "Woman Crying," Galerie Neu
Anne Collier, “Woman Crying,” Galerie Neu

 

Through her work, Anne Collier explores the complexities of representation as a way of reclaiming cultural references. Her work features casually arranged, but meticulously detailed pictures of mass market and popular culture projects, posters, books, LP albums, and magazine covers that date predominantly from the ’70s to the early ’80s.

Collier’s focus on this “near past” carefully circumnavigates themes of self-representation, portraiture, and biography. There are no eye teasers—at lease not in the cheap sense that the images clamor to get your attention. Instead, there is a sense of control maintained, a distance kept. Still, the feeling remains that there is more to the images that meets the eye.

 

Artist: Wolfgang Tillmans

Gallery: Galerie Buchholz

Location: Fasanenstrasse 20, 10719 Berlin

 

A pet mouse that Wolfgang found in his London studio. Wolfgang Tilmans, "Studio," Galerie Bucholz
A pet mouse that Wolfgang found in his London studio.

 

Wolfgang Tillman's, “Studio,” Galerie Buchholz
Wolfgang Tillman’s, “Studio,” Galerie Buchholz

 

In “Studio,” his twelfth solo exhibition at Galerie Buchholz, Wolfgang Tillmans thematizes his place of production: the artist’s studio. He explores the studio’s role as a complex entity or an apparatus that is itself generative. Not a peel behind the scenes, but an attempt to create a cartographical representation of what this space and its contents mean to him.

“Studio” suggest a spectrum of designations: a photopraphic darkroom, a place for manual production, a viewing space for the artworks, and lastly, a testing ground to place works in different configurations.

“Studio” is inherently a social space in which different  practices are carried out in immediate proximity to one another—an archive room in which an artist’s work is produced, managed, and housed. As the place where he spends the majority of his time, the studio inevitably bears the signature of the artist’s inclinations, his daily routine, and the people who surround him.

 

Artist: Jerry Hsu

Gallery: HVW8

Location: Linienstr. 161, 10115 Berlin

Jerry Hsu, “ A LOVE LIKE MINE IS HARD TO FIND,” HVW8 Gallery
Jerry Hsu “A LOVE LIKE MINE IS HARD TO FIND” HVW8 Gallery

 

Jerry Hsu’s desire to capture all that is beautifully disregarded around him has certainly paid off; it would appear that he has created his own vernacular through an effectively mastered vision.

Sensitivity to events that seem like non-events adjusts one’s perspective by shifting the focus to things often missed. Hsu honors those moments outside of the frame; he looks where others might not be as compelled to look.

An emotional dualism accompanies the apparent everydayness of Hsu’s snapshot style. His imagery may contain an unmistakable tenderness, while still communicating its exact opposite sentiment.

 

Artist: Petra Cortright

Gallery: Societe

Location: Genthiner Strasse 36, 10785 Berlin

 

Petra Cortright, Die Rose, Societe Berlin
Petra Cortright, Die Rose, Societe Berlin

 

Petra Cortright, “BUFFY_THE_VAMPIRE_SLAYERdj149du.exe, 2016,” Societe Gallery
Petra Cortright, “BUFFY_THE_VAMPIRE_SLAYERdj149du.exe, 2016,” Societe Gallery

 

Petra Cortright’s first video webcam, “vvebcam,” made in 2007, is known for satirizing the cultural wave of “selfies.” In 2012, she began working with animated virtual strippers she found online.

Many of Cortright’s work here are derived from a single Photoshop file composed of hundreds of layers of found images and marks made by custom digital brushes. Each digital layer is printed individually, hence producing a material depth not possible on a computer screen.

Her compositions include resonant symbols like roses—prevalent in both historical iconology and today’s Tumblr-cult teenage girl culture—alongside outdated screensavers of dancing strippers.

Filling its viewers with a sense that resembles the feeling one gets after long sessions of Internet browsing—during which endless image search results produce a state of hypnosis—Cortright’s production taps into your cyber stream of consciousness.