February 21, 2013
MARISSA WEBB leather pant, COMMES DES GARCONS jacket, STYLIST'S OWN necklace, YUVI ALPERT bracelet
NOVIS velvet jumpsuit
NOVIS velvet jumpsuit
MARISSA WEBB leather pant, COMMES DES GARCONS jacket, STYLIST'S OWN necklace, YUVI ALPERT bracelet
COMMES DES GARCONS dress, YSL pants, CELINE shoes
KARL LAGERFELD dress, YUVI ALPERT bracelet
MATHIEU MIRANO sweater, BILLY REID leather pant, STETSON hat
MATHIEU MIRANO sweater, BILLY REID leather pant, STETSON hat
MARISSA WEBB leather pant, COMMES DES GARCONS jacket, STYLIST'S OWN necklace, YUVI ALPERT bracelet
NOVIS velvet jumpsuit
NOVIS velvet jumpsuit
MARISSA WEBB leather pant, COMMES DES GARCONS jacket, STYLIST'S OWN necklace, YUVI ALPERT bracelet
COMMES DES GARCONS dress, YSL pants, CELINE shoes
KARL LAGERFELD dress, YUVI ALPERT bracelet
MATHIEU MIRANO sweater, BILLY REID leather pant, STETSON hat
MATHIEU MIRANO sweater, BILLY REID leather pant, STETSON hat

You likely recognize Rebecca Dayan as the effortless beauty Andy Samberg knocked up in Celeste & Jesse Forever. Since then, the New York-based actress has kept busy with a string of short films and, as is evident in these dreamy photographs, has managed to remain as coquettish and alluring as ever.

PHOTOGRAPHER: Libby Gray
STYLING: Danielle Nachmani
HAIR & MAKE UP: Lizzie Arneson

Photography by Libby Gray

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February 19, 2013

Jamie Lidell is known for his spontaneity. In a 2006 video interview for PitchFork, the British-born musician appears somewhat manic, if endearing: he jumps atop a wooden coffee table in a hotel suite to preform a Russian Trepak dance, attempts to spin on his head, and illustrates Indian throat singing for the camera. His past five albums have been called schizophrenic, moving from electronic pop to ’70s soul. For Lidell, however, music-making is about chasing an idea, rather than cohesion.

“I think I’m just a curious guy,” he said. “I find so many things so fascinating, I’ve got that post-modern condition. I would never want to draw straight lines.”

Leaning against the window at Brown Cafe on the Lower East Side, in a bright blue sweater and a five-o’clock shadow, Lidell is mild and composed, even after three cups of coffee. He eats a bear claw pastry and dots the crumbs off the plate with his finger. “You can’t get this in Nashville, but you get spoiled in New York,” he reflected.

Two years ago Lidell and his wife, and manager, Lindsey, swapped their Chelsea apartment in New York for a 3,500 sq. ft. home in Nashville. Trying create music in an apartment, where mere conversation can be overheard by a neighbor—not to mention the thumping vibrations from a music studio—proved a challenge.

“I couldn’t stretch out at all, literally and metaphorically,” he said. “Art can’t flourish when it is too fucking expensive. In Nashville there are incredible musicians everywhere, it’s a joke.”

On his sixth, self-titled album, which was released today, Lidell presents a relevant electronic beat blended to the whine of his R&B vocals. It is every bit the kaleidoscope of what has come before—a mesh of pop, electronic, funk, and soul—but his calm home life has left space to make music that is highly energetic and clearly joyful.

“What a Shame,” the first single off the album, was made while washing the dishes. Ever the techno-nerd, Lidell runs the recorder on his iPhone, storing random beats and lines of sound for future inspiration.

“I was trying to sing through the water and I knew I was writing on the subject of ‘I really didn’t want this to end,’ so I put my mind in a place where I had that emotion in the past. I kept it really simple because the beat is really raw. A lot of the album is like that.”

“What a Shame” is on the electronic-pop side of Lidell’s spectrum. It is one of the more organic sounding tracks—the entrance of the voice and pulse of the beat are thrown down at exactly the right moments—feeling both gritty and smooth. Lidell collaborated with Justin Stanley, an Australian who’s produced for Beck and The Vines, and the pair had just 10 days to nail together the album, which had been a year in the making. Over that year Lidell used his new Nashville studio—a converted modern library with floor to ceiling bookcases—to produce albums for Pegasus Warning and Guillermo Brown.

“Sound is a really mysterious thing,” Lidell said. “If you just sit in a room and think about sound and think about music it doesn’t add up. But once you start making sound, just playing, the emotion comes through the sound and the sound tells you what to do.”

Lidell finds his inspiration from machinery.  For him, the physical experience of creating originates in the history of a musical instrument and the reverberations that come through it. Growing up around classical music, Lidell always felt encourage to express himself through sound. The first instrument he picked up was the trombone, a self-admittedly random choice, but it taught him the subtleties of precision and tuning. Next, Lidell turned to the guitar and automatically tried to grade at the cords, seeking something more electric and “fuzzed out.” At 16 he got a synthesizer and that was the turning point. “It’s the ultimate punk instrument because you can take any sound and make it yours,” he said. “It allowed poor musicians to access the annals of history, just hit record.” A sampler, Lidell explained, allows access to music made in costly production studios with enormous budgets just by combining tracks, “It takes the elitism out of recording.”

Now he is returning to the piano, learning it crudely from scratch. “Piano is a percussion instrument, really, because the string is limited so you have to have rhythm,” he illustrated the short banging motion required when hitting each key. “You have every note in the scale and so you get a sense of the [entire] scope of western music.”

For Jamie Lidell the instrument and inspiration was a 56-key 12-foot long console used to make Paula Abdul’s iconic 1988 track “Straight Up.” He likes the coldness of the machine, a hollow loneliness, warmed by adding in real drums.

The album was also a product of food. Late breakfasts and slow-cooked macrobiotic meals gave him the energy to sustain long studio sessions. He compared the album to homemade bread that is kneaded by hand, needs time to rise, and is cooked to create aromatic smells—a sharp contrast to the pace of a city and a take-out anatomy.

“I want to challenge myself to get beyond where I was in my last incarnation,” he said, “Mutation is part of survival.”

Going out solo on the brink of his world tour provides that challenge—this album is more complicated and technologically reliant then his past work.  Now approaching 40, Lidell seems like a more mature version of his past selves, his former mania manifesting as a quieter, highly intellectual passion and concern for the craft.

“You need to be obsessive to be good, you can’t be half hearted,” he said.  “I only really trust nerds, because where is you passion? Only if you live and breathe it, then I can relate.”

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January 16, 2013

If there is one thing people know about Shemar Moore, it’s that he is a beautiful man. From superfluous fan sites to his 130,542 twitter followers, “baby boy” knows the ladies love him and how to keep them hooked. In twitpics, the 42-year-old shows throw-back photos of himself as a child in pressed short-shorts, puffed afro, and an endearing pout, captioned: “Do I have to wear this mom?” and looking nearly-dorky in his high school yearbook headshot. He can afford the embarrassment. After starting a modeling career in New York, Moore got his big break in 1995, playing heartthrob Malcolm Winters on The Young and The Restless, and after 10 years left the soap circuit for the world of primetime. Now on the eighth season of Criminal Minds, as the muscular and cunning Derek Morgan, Moore has established himself as nothing short of a badass.

Inked with five tattoos—“I’m all about inking my body if it means something,” he said—his last tattoo is of the words “Carpe Diem” colored with the faces of Martin Luther King Jr., President Obama, and Malcolm X. With feature-film aspirations, Moore wants people to know he is more than a pretty face, and is launching a new website (personal poetry included) and clothing line, to show his fans the leading man behind the six-pack. On his way to the Peoples Choice Awards, he talked to BULLETT about the dark side of Criminal Minds, social media in Hollywood, and interior design.

How did your interest in acting develop?
For whatever reason, if it was because I didn’t grow up with my father or for whatever reason, I was really shy. I mean I was a fun little kid and once I knew you liked me, I was in it to win it sort of speak.  When I got into high school I was a jock because I was really good at sports and that was one of the ways I made friends and was cool and all that stuff, because that’s what mattered when you were a kid. It wasn’t cool if you were a jock, the acting community of kids was kind of like the weirdos, but I just was fascinated. I would sneak into the theatre department and I would watch the kids do plays. I thought it was cool that they could put on wardrobe and wigs and things, and whether they were doing Shakespeare or Romeo and Juliet or whatever, I just thought it was cool that they were becoming something that they weren’t, they were becoming another person.  So I kind of got bit, without knowing it, to be able to be somebody else.

You were on The Young and The Restless for many years. What are the differences between recurring on a soap opera and a police procedural?
On the soap, Malcolm Winters was pretty much me being me.  Every character you play has some semblance of yourself. You may have a funny haircut or grow a beard or get fat or get skinny or talk a certain way, but it’s still you. As far as personality and choices, Malcolm is just very close to my personality, my sense of humor. But with Derek Morgan, he’s an FBI profiler. It’s really cool to be able to kick down doors and play the tough guy and be a boss and be in the world that Derek Morgan is in. But Shemar Moore has a lot more fun than Derek Morgan, because of the world Derek Morgan is immersed in.

What is it like working with such graphic material each week?
I never forget that I’m playing pretend. I know that it is all make believe. We tease the writers all the time, like – how do you come up with this stuff?  You must need a shrink or be an alcoholic— what’s going on in your mind?  Is your wife scared of you, is your husband scared of you, do you think like this? But it’s weird because we’ll be on the set, we have these actors that come in with this heinous makeup on, where their throats are slit and their private parts are cut off, their legs, their body has been dismembered. It’s sad that that type of stuff happens around the world, and it humbles the shit out of you. As far as acting and emoting, you’ve got to dig within yourself and find the truth, so that the weight of what’s going on really comes out, because if you don’t believe yourself then the audience isn’t going to believe you.

Do you think the show’s cerebral aspect makes it unique from other criminal dramas?
At first when I got the show, I was like ok, you’ve got 102 cop shows, why do you need another one?  But I say that Criminal Minds is like Silence of the Lambs meets Seven. The real stars of Criminal Minds is the “unsub.”  The “unsub” is what we called the bad guy.  You tune in to see just how twisted these people are, and then you feel compassion for the victims.  People seem to like to look through the peep-hole of these dark worlds, but through that thick glass where they know they are protected. And I think that’s what Criminal Minds is. They get to see this crazy world because they are curious and they kind of have a fascination with these types of crimes, they want to learn what they need to learn, and then they want to turn it off and feel really safe in whatever environment they live in.  So I think it is a thrill-ride for 42 minutes and then they can go back to their regularly scheduled life.

What has been your proudest moment as an actor?
The fact that I am still here and I am still growing and still climbing the ladder to success.  And that a year ago I was fortunate enough and blessed enough to buy my mother her dream condo in Redondo Beach. Growing up, I was told we would never see a black president in our lifetime and here I am, 42 years old, and we not only have a black president, we have a biracial president, who I can relate to.  We have a president of color, we have a president that wether he gets the job situation together or the healthcare situation together – I want him to be the best president he can be – but in my mind he has already made history and he has already changed the landscape of this country by being president. It’s not about him being black, it is about changing the views of this country, that we are beginning to see past color.  We are getting closer to what my mother and father fought for in the late ’60s, and so many others, of just seeing people as equals.  So I am proud to see a person of color, somebody bi-racial like me, becoming prominent.

I know that I am affecting people and I know that I reach people and I know that I am inspiring people just because I chased a dream of mine.

Tell me about your relationship with social media.
Six months ago I didn’t know anything about Facebook or Twitter, I was against it. But then I got a better sense of how it all works, and because I have the celebrity that I have and people are curious about me and what I’m doing, I didn’t just want to do a self-involved thing like, Hey, look at me, I’m great! I wanted to do something that people could kind of related to. The power of social media is crazy and I’m brand new, I’m a rookie, I don’t even know how to direct message. I’m still trying to figure it out.

Now when you go for jobs as an actor, they don’t ask you what your resume is. They ask you what your twitter following is, they ask you how many followers you have on Facebook. It’s kinda nuts. It’s like wait, I wanna work with Tom Cruise and the actor that’s gonna get the role is gonna have the biggest Facebook following? But there is some truth to that because Hollywood wants to know that you are going to put people in the seats.

What is something not many people know about you?
I’ve been interior decorating. I don’t talk about it a lot, I didn’t take any classes or anything. I just have a knack for picking colors and I kind of have a vision for composition and things like that. I’ve been living in my current home for about six years and I decorated and redecorated and remodeled it from head to toe so it is really, really my signature.

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January 15, 2013

Donald Glover is best known for his role as Troy Barnes, a goofy and endearing member of the odd-ball gang that dominate Greendale Community College. But prior to the return of the 4th season of Community, you can catch Glover in some compromising, and decidedly HBO-worthy moments on the season two premier of Girls. He plays Sandy, Hannah’s (Lena Dunham) new “non” boyfriend, who gives Dunham even more reasons to take off her clothes throughout the 20-minute episode. Like much of Girls, the dynamic of their relationship has the gritty and uncomfortably real element of coupling for twenty-somethings: detached attachment. Here, in a video from the vault Glover rifts with BULLETT (and an inanimate ghoul) to reveal his multifaceted comic stylings and tendency to hold a grudge.

Donald Glover from BULLETT MEDIA on Vimeo.

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January 14, 2013

With the launch of the Everest Anniversary celebration at London Fashion Week, Bally ushered in five new collections that blend the longevity of great craftsmanship with modern style.   For Autumn-Winter 2013, in addition to the ready-to-wear mountaineer inspired boots of the ‘Everest’ Collection, Bally has introduced the ‘Injection Moulded Lug Sole’ that utilizes the same non-slip sole capable of high-altitude climbing with a sophisticated business shoe.  The hand-colored and hand-finished calf leather shoes comes in four autumnal colors and in either an oxford or ankle boot style.  Everest has also inspired ‘Cervo,’ a line of light-weight leather outerwear, from deer-skin bomber jackers to durable desert boots.  If mountaineering is not your strong suit, Bally has outfitted techie-accessories like iPad and Smartphone cases, as well as travel attaches and wallets, in copper or bark-colored calf-leather for the ‘Milano’ Business collection.  Finally, they have updated the ‘Bally Stripe,’ the classic red and white striped collection of casual weekender bags maintaining the linear trim and the Bally buckle.  From the great outdoors to urban captivity, Bally has created the perfect blend of rugged chic.

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January 14, 2013

In a dark and dreamy collage of crocodile prints, perforated leather, and grainy blocks of color, Proenza Schouler has launched their Spring Summer 2013 ad campaign. Australian model Julia Nobis and Russia’s Irina Nikolaeva embody the entity of the brand with chopped and beach-dried dirty blond hair and nude, slightly vacant expressions. The campaign features the quintessential red leather jacket and matching A-line skirt patterned with straight black lines and squares of textured leather to create a heavy, boxed affect.  Nobis wears the cut-out knee-high gladiator boots that dominated the footwear on the Spring 2013 runway, while standing in a dilapidated and sun-streaked room. Juxtaposing the futuristic energy of sharp geometric shapes with nearly whimsical hues and domineering textures, the union of these abstract images epitomize the vision behind Proenza Schouler’s Spring collection.

The ads will appear in the March issues of Vogue, W, and Harper’s Bazaar and premiered online today.

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January 12, 2013

BULLETT is bringing you to the front row of Milan Men’s Fashion Week. For Spring ’12 Italo Zucchelli, Men’s Creative Director for the Calvin Klein, featured head-to-toe denim ensembles, tucked t-shirts, and kakis two-pieces from casual-wear to business attire.  The line was mostly monotone save for a deep burgundy color-blot which transitioned into a nearly-Hawaiian floral screen, all cut in a classic all-American style.  Finally transitioning to stream-lined silver tones and structured leather jackets, the collection had a distinctly 1950s greaser feel.

Streaming live from Milan early Sunday morning, watch the premier of Calvin Klein Men’s Collection right here for the latest in Zucchelli’s signature formal lines and original materials.

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January 8, 2013

Last night during London Fashion Week, Bally launched a yearlong celebration commemorating the first summit of Mt. Everest in 1953 with a thematic party.  The room was decorated like a base-camp tent, colored in dark tan tones and strewn with camping gear – antique kettles, sleeping bags, and shorn-fur rugs piled in precarious mounds.  The party was also littered with ruggedly handsome British men, from actors Benedict Cumberbatch and Jack Guinness to television presenter Rick Edwards.

In Bally’s 162 years in the business of footwear, the company has participated in many history-making moments.  However it was exactly 60 years ago that Max Bally created the textured rubber sole and supportive shell insulated with reindeer fur that was durable enough to climb the worlds tallest mountain.  When Tenzing Norgay and Sir Edmund Hillary became the first people to stand atop the highest point on earth, Norgay was wearing the Bally Reindeer-Himalaya boots.

For 2013, Bally is revealing the Everest capsule collection, three men’s boots designed for alpine trekking with lightweight soles and the 360 Degree Non-Slip Bally Grip patented in 1919. The Vilmos boot is specifically inspired by the first expedition, maintaining the hook-up laces from the original German manufacturer but updated with a cashmere and marmot fur lining.  Each boot is defined by a Norwegian double-stitch edging.

With the premier of the collection Bally hopes to instill inspiration for the feats that footwear can enable a person to achieve.  What can you do in your boots?

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January 8, 2013

With short blonde ringlets and a wide-eyed innocence, 26-year-old Georgia King looks like a Disney character come to life. In her latest role as Goldie Clemmons on Ryan Murphy’s NBC comedy, The New Normal, she plays a Midwestern, former teen mom looking for a way to improve life for herself and her nine-year-old daughter. Naturally, she decides to move to Hollywood, but instead of seeking fame, she aspires to be a lawyer and elects to be the surrogate for a wealthy gay couple as a way to foot the bill for her new life.

Unlike her character, the UK native, grew up in an idyllic pastoral setting with a loving, accepting family (mother, father, and sister) and similarly idyllic pathway into acting. She was working in a cheese shop just before beginning college when she was approached by an agent who recognized her from a school play and offered her representation.  At age 18 she landed her first role in the BBC mini-series Jane Eyre, and this spring will star alongside Keri Russell, in Austenland, a comedy in which the Jane Austen obsession has been leveraged into a theme park fantasy experience. Here, King talks tabout the impact of an unconventional/conventional sitcom for an American TV audience, the power of comedy, and being fake-pregnant:

How do you relate to the character of Goldie, who is a parent, and whose life and background are so different from your own?
On paper we are actually very, very different. I mean, I’m British and she’s American, she’s a waitress and I’m an actress, and you know, she has a daughter and a husband and a whole different life than mine. I’ve been fortunate enough to travel and see a lot of the world and this is a women who has been very limited in her opportunities. But the characteristics that Goldie has I absolutely relate to, and in a weird sort of way, she is probably the character I’ve felt closest to out of everything I’ve played in the last two years of acting. Also, I’ve oddly been inspired playing the character because she is so selfless and she is so bright and kind and positive. I think working on a character like that is very influential on yourself.

Did you do anything to prepare for the role of Goldie?
Yes, obviously the American accent is a big one. Also I was really keen to understand what it would be like to be somebody in the Midwest, in Ohio specifically, with her background and what would that make her as a person. Bebe (Wood) – the actress who plays Goldie’s capricious nine-year-old daughter, Shania – and I spent a lot of time off-set around each other to really feel so comfortable with each other. Bebe nowadays doesn’t think twice about climbing up onto my lap and rubbing my belly, and like hugging me, or asking me for a massage, or whatever it is. So that was another thing that was very important to me, was that our bond, which is so important on the show, was very real and believable.

Like your character Goldie, you recently made a big move to LA. What was that like for you?
There are so many parallels with Goldie’s initial journey to mine. In the pilot she leaves her husband and drives to LA. Just before the pilot on the way to the airport, I went through a horrible breakup, a painful breakup. Purely because I read Goldie’s story and I was like, if she can ask for better a situation in her life so can I. So I took a leap of faith and I got on a flight and I was overwhelmed in LA but also very happy and excited.

What is the oddest situation you’ve found yourself in for this role?
It’s odd being pregnant! It’s wonderful. I mean, what I find weird about being pregnant is the fact that I enjoy it so much. Like oh man, sixth months, and I get my belly on, and it’s like everything is right in the world.

What has your experience been working with Ryan Murphy, the co-creator of The New Normal?
Ryan is a terrific, incredible man. I hadn’t really come across Ryan, actually, except for seeing his shows. I loved American Horror season one, and Glee I just started watching. I just got Netflix and I was like ‘Oh of course it’s like this!’ because it’s Ryan has got a wonderful unique taste and style. He is  ahead of the time with the shows. You know, Nip/Tuck is talking about image and plastic surgery and you watch that now and it feels very current as a show – the fact that it was made years ago is just extraordinary. I think working with Ryan is as close as I’ve ever come to working with a genius.

What do you see as the cultural impact of The New Normal?
I know that it is ruffling a few feathers, but I really hope that it helps encourage acceptance. I was quite surprised when I moved out here to do the show in July, we did some press, and before we’d even filmed we had the Million Mom protest and it was banned in Utah. I was so surprised, purely because I don’t think you necessarily have to agree with everything in the show – I respect peoples’ opinions and I respect peoples right to voice those opinions – but without even seeing the show I felt like that reaction was severe, rather than anything of substance, because I think what our show is saying is so normal to me. I also hope the show shows any single parents out there – the kind of person that I am representing – that you can do it and you will survive, however scary it is.  I think Goldie is a very important voice for single parents.

Critics have said that The New Normal doesn’t offer anything new, because gay marriage and gay parenting are frontiers already touched on by shows like Modern Family and Will & Grace. What do you find original about The New Normal?
I think those shows are amazing. I’m obsessed with Modern Family, I think it is comedy genius. But I think there hasn’t been a show where the central couple are gay, nor has there been a show where you see a gay couple really in love and really exploring every finite detail of their life. I don’t see many gay couples kissing nor do I see many mixed racial couples. Like my character’s love interest is played by an actor called Sterling Sulieman, who is a beautiful black actor, and I think those are important things to be showing. I feel like Will & Grace and Modern Family and that show Partners, I think they are vital stepping stones for something like The New Normal. But I don’t think another show has gone quite so far and committed quite so hard to the idea of a mix-matched family.

Do you think comedy is an effective medium for conveying serious social issues?
Absolutely. If you look back in history, humor has been a way of being able to discuss situations. I remember studying history when I was younger, specifically studying humor that was used during the Second World War. It is a way of communicating a lot of pain actually. Humor is used not only to make people laugh but also to communicate problems – to communicate anxiety, fear, pain – and it is a really effective tool for those things.

Do you have any aspirations for what you hope to see Goldie achieve in her journey as a character?
Without giving too much away, finding who she is and her strengths. Realizing that she is a successful good women is a huge part of what I hope Goldie achieves. I think her happiness towards other people is quite strong but she has quite a lot of self-doubt, and so I think it would be feeling comfortable in herself. From personal experience moving to LA, there is a strong pressure on image and all of those things. I have to say that I feel very happy to be, you know, who I am and be comfortable in my skin and not feel like I have to conform to anything too severe. Also, to have a womanly shape and be comfortable with that and know that that is ok. Those are the things that I see in myself that I think Goldie probably feels as well.

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December 20, 2012
DRIES VAN NOTEN, jacket.
DRIED VAN NOTEN jacket, CALVIN KLEIN COLLECTION jacket, t-shirt, and pants
RAF SIMONS shirt, shorts, and sneakers, AMERICAN APPAREL socks
JOHN VARVATOS jacket
PRADA jacket, shirt, and pants
J.W. ANDERSON coat
KRISVANASSCHE jacket, t-shirt, pants, and boots
JIL SANDER sweater, shirt, and pants
TOPMAN DESIGN sweater
JONATHAN SAUNDERS sweater, MAISON MARTIN MARGIELA jeans
MUGLER jacket, shorts, and shoes
DRIES VAN NOTEN, jacket.
DRIED VAN NOTEN jacket, CALVIN KLEIN COLLECTION jacket, t-shirt, and pants
RAF SIMONS shirt, shorts, and sneakers, AMERICAN APPAREL socks
JOHN VARVATOS jacket
PRADA jacket, shirt, and pants
J.W. ANDERSON coat
KRISVANASSCHE jacket, t-shirt, pants, and boots
JIL SANDER sweater, shirt, and pants
TOPMAN DESIGN sweater
JONATHAN SAUNDERS sweater, MAISON MARTIN MARGIELA jeans
MUGLER jacket, shorts, and shoes

Photography by Aitken Jolly
Styling by Jason Hughes

Hair: Chi Wong at Julian Watson, Makeup: Zoe Taylor at Jed Root using MAC Cosmetics, Set Designer: Andrea Cellerino at The Magnet Agency, Model: Ben Allen at Select, Casting: Nic Burns at Star & Co., Digital Technician: Luke Cartledge, Photographer’s Assistants: Jack Day and Rob Willey, Stylist’s Assistants: Isabella Goumal and Ella Crisp, Set Designer’s Assistant: Thomas Petherick

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