February 4, 2013
Waiting to leave Boston.  5 AM, 20 degrees.
Just a bear in the big city.  No big deal.
Fast forward to Ohio, and it looks like this.
Truck stop hottie getting Internet famous.
There were serious meetings happening all around us in Chicago.
Strategizing
Chicago hotel morning.  You can almost see Al Capone in the window over there.
The pure joy of Waffle House virgins.
There are so many of these in the Midwest that you’d think the Earth would get pushed off its orbit.
Gettin’ cheesy in Wisconsin.
This dude DJ’s a bar in Minnesota from the attic, “best job ever, bro”.
Tretorn is a Swedish brand, so when they heard about these Dala horses in northern Minnesota, it was go-time.  Then we got there and it was -10 degrees, and it became “get back in the car” time.
They all kind of look the same in the dark.
This sunrise is brought to you by Sonic.
When you spend two weeks in a car with four people, this is good advice.
Culinary adventures in truck stop land.
This guy just sat there for the longest time, sighing and looking at his watch.  Sometimes Match.com can suck.
The Midwest.
Pretty surprised to find President Obama waiting in the North Platte, Nebraska Days Inn lobby at 4 AM.
Just another roadside attraction.
Buffalo busking.
Sadly, it was sold out.
Ran into these cats in Colorado enjoying early AM Bloody Marys.  When asked if they were in a band, they fist bumped, “hells yeah”.
The Sinclair gas logo is a dinosaur.  And gas is just old dinosaurs.  Get it?
Buffalo Bill’s ghost at Buffalo Bill’s official gravesite.
50 degrees out and ice fishing in the Colorado mountains.
Social media kingpin Bryant Eslava tries his luck.
This was in a real ghost town.  Scary trip moment: all of our shots from this place came out weird.  Spooky.
The long and icy road to Utah
All the plants in Moab were covered with a ¼” of crystal clear ice.
Sunrise in Moab at Balanced Rock.
Ain’t no party like a gutter punk burrito party.
Skate shoe upcycling.
Wide open road.
This gent had travelled almost 2 thousand miles to pray on what to do with his new back to the land church.
Best named gas station.  Period.
Economic development.
Another day, another Waffle House.
The mayor of Park City.
Pensive moments with Mad Men’s January Jones at Sundance.
Our bartender at the High West Distillery’s reaction to, well, everything we had to say.
The Milkman and friends get down at Sundance.
Street style with Leila
If it’s not on Instagram, it’s not real.
This fellow opened for Naughty By Nature and had the crowd all wound up.
Sundance is down with OPP.
Rising or setting?  Who can tell anymore?
Waiting to leave Boston. 5 AM, 20 degrees.
Just a bear in the big city. No big deal.
Fast forward to Ohio, and it looks like this.
Truck stop hottie getting Internet famous.
There were serious meetings happening all around us in Chicago.
Strategizing
Chicago hotel morning. You can almost see Al Capone in the window over there.
The pure joy of Waffle House virgins.
There are so many of these in the Midwest that you’d think the Earth would get pushed off its orbit.
Gettin’ cheesy in Wisconsin.
This dude DJ’s a bar in Minnesota from the attic, “best job ever, bro”.
Tretorn is a Swedish brand, so when they heard about these Dala horses in northern Minnesota, it was go-time. Then we got there and it was -10 degrees, and it became “get back in the car” time.
They all kind of look the same in the dark.
This sunrise is brought to you by Sonic.
When you spend two weeks in a car with four people, this is good advice.
Culinary adventures in truck stop land.
This guy just sat there for the longest time, sighing and looking at his watch. Sometimes Match.com can suck.
The Midwest.
Pretty surprised to find President Obama waiting in the North Platte, Nebraska Days Inn lobby at 4 AM.
Just another roadside attraction.
Buffalo busking.
Sadly, it was sold out.
Ran into these cats in Colorado enjoying early AM Bloody Marys. When asked if they were in a band, they fist bumped, “hells yeah”.
The Sinclair gas logo is a dinosaur. And gas is just old dinosaurs. Get it?
Buffalo Bill’s ghost at Buffalo Bill’s official gravesite.
50 degrees out and ice fishing in the Colorado mountains.
Social media kingpin Bryant Eslava tries his luck.
This was in a real ghost town. Scary trip moment: all of our shots from this place came out weird. Spooky.
The long and icy road to Utah
All the plants in Moab were covered with a ¼” of crystal clear ice.
Sunrise in Moab at Balanced Rock.
Ain’t no party like a gutter punk burrito party.
Skate shoe upcycling.
Wide open road.
This gent had travelled almost 2 thousand miles to pray on what to do with his new back to the land church.
Best named gas station. Period.
Economic development.
Another day, another Waffle House.
The mayor of Park City.
Pensive moments with Mad Men’s January Jones at Sundance.
Our bartender at the High West Distillery’s reaction to, well, everything we had to say.
The Milkman and friends get down at Sundance.
Street style with Leila
If it’s not on Instagram, it’s not real.
This fellow opened for Naughty By Nature and had the crowd all wound up.
Sundance is down with OPP.
Rising or setting? Who can tell anymore?

The road trip is an American classic. A rite of passage, one of those things everyone “has” to do at least once. Crossing the wide, lonely expanses of our country, moments fading into hours as mile markers blaze up then fade away into the darkness behind, puts things into a new perspective.

It’s also a lot of fun.

While the road trip story is a classic, it has also been done to death by touring companies and bands. It was my thought that taking the northern route, driving the Interstate in the dead of winter and hitting roadside attractions along the way, would give a new twist to an old idea. How many people want to drive 12 hours out of their way in negative degree weather to take a photo of a Swedish horse sculpture?  We did.  And I have the windburn to prove it.

The idea for this trip was pretty simple: Team up with Swedish shoe brand Tretorn and drive from their HQ in Boston to Salt Lake City, shooting photos along the way with Impossible Project instant film,  on old Polaroid cameras. Upon arrival, the images would be culled into a ‘zine and pop-up photo exhibit for the Outdoor Retailer Show and Sundance Film Festival, respectively.

One thing you can count on with any adventure like this is eventually it will take on a life of its own.  All those hours in the car forge a tribe-like bond between travelers, an us-against-them mentality that makes other, more normal interactions seem strange at first.  One’s sense of personal space and what is appropriate become skewed… There are no secrets in the humid confines of a mid-size SUV.

I’ll let the photos tell the story, but between harassing toll attendants, crashing a high-end men’s clothier with our resident bear, ice fishing next to a ghost town in the Colorado mountains in spring-like temperatures, almost freezing to death in Moab and somehow winding up at a Naughty By Nature concert at the Sundance Film Festival, it was one hell of a ride.

All photos taken on Impossible Project PX680 Color Protection film, with the exception of the lone black and white image, which is on PX100 silver shade.

See more of our adventures on Instgram via username jjamesjoiner and #tretorntrip

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November 30, 2012
MARNI Vest, skirt, earrings and beaded collar, 0039 ITALY white top, RICHARD CHAI LOVE jacket, FLUTTER BY JILL necklace
BALENCIAGA all
ROCHAS body suit, ROBERTO CAVALLI jacket, ARIELLE DE PINTO mesh and gem plated necklace, BING BANG silver collar, ANDRA NEEN silver and gold bracelet, ALEXIS BITTAR bangles
RAG AND BONE jacket, HARVEY FAIRCLOTHE top and shorts, GIO DIEV shoes, SASKIA DIEZ wooden bead bracelet, MARNI bangles
JIL SANDER jacket, LISA MARIE FERNANDEZ swim top, MARNI earrings and peach cuff, ALEXIX BITTAR bangles
JULIA JENTZSCH trousers, ONHE TITEL leggings, SALVATORE FERREGAMO Jacket, HARVEY FAIRCLOTHE top, NATALIE FRIGO necklaces, MARNI earrings and shoes, BING BANG white studded bangle, ALEXIS BITTAR bangles
RAG AND BONE knit top,MALENE BIRGER trousers, CHANEL belt,SPORTMAX jacket, ANDRA NEEN silver bracelet, MARNI white bracelet
RAG AND BONE skirt and bikini top, FORTMAKERS shirt dress, ASOS jacket, ALEXIS BITTAR bangles, MAWI necklace, ROCHAS shoes
ALTUZZARA vest and trousers, YSL jacket, FIONA PAXTON collar necklace, ANDY LIFSCHUTZ gold necklace
MARNI Vest, skirt, earrings and beaded collar, 0039 ITALY white top, RICHARD CHAI LOVE jacket, FLUTTER BY JILL necklace
BALENCIAGA all
ROCHAS body suit, ROBERTO CAVALLI jacket, ARIELLE DE PINTO mesh and gem plated necklace, BING BANG silver collar, ANDRA NEEN silver and gold bracelet, ALEXIS BITTAR bangles
RAG AND BONE jacket, HARVEY FAIRCLOTHE top and shorts, GIO DIEV shoes, SASKIA DIEZ wooden bead bracelet, MARNI bangles
JIL SANDER jacket, LISA MARIE FERNANDEZ swim top, MARNI earrings and peach cuff, ALEXIX BITTAR bangles
JULIA JENTZSCH trousers, ONHE TITEL leggings, SALVATORE FERREGAMO Jacket, HARVEY FAIRCLOTHE top, NATALIE FRIGO necklaces, MARNI earrings and shoes, BING BANG white studded bangle, ALEXIS BITTAR bangles
RAG AND BONE knit top, MALENE BIRGER trousers, CHANEL belt, SPORTMAX jacket, ANDRA NEEN silver bracelet, MARNI white bracelet
RAG AND BONE skirt and bikini top, FORTMAKERS shirt dress, ASOS jacket, ALEXIS BITTAR bangles, MAWI necklace, ROCHAS shoes
ALTUZZARA vest and trousers, YSL jacket, FIONA PAXTON collar necklace, ANDY LIFSCHUTZ gold necklace

Photographer: Nicholas Routzen represented by Traction Artist Management
Model: Chrishell @ Supreme
Stylist: Julie Brooke Williams
Hair: Adam Markarian for Wella
Makeup: Kristin Hilton at the Wall Group for Shiseido Cosmetics
Photo Assistant: Nick Smythe, Valentine Malone
Shot at MILK Studios

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May 1, 2012

It’s maybe gotten to the point when, instead of praising Jamie Stewart for the quality of his output as Xiu Xiu, someone should talk to the man about what’s going on inside his head. Xiu Xiu’s music has reached a consistency in tone—an off-kilter, perturbing moan—that’s impressive when you consider it’s gone more or less unchanged for nine records now. And while it’s alright for listeners, maybe it’s not alright for Stewart. At the very least, it seems like someone should buy him a Carpenters album, just to show him that the world has a softer side.

If you forgot how grim Xiu Xiu tends to be, the band just dropped a video for their track “Honeysuckle” to remind you. It follows band member Angela Seo as she goes about her day, and girl doesn’t seem to be able to do anything right: she brushes her teeth until they bleed, she tries to eat an apple that looks to have some sort of mammalian center, and appears to take a shower in a latex bodysuit. You will never get clean that away Angela, the water has to touch your skin!

If all of that wasn’t enough, shots of asphyxiating fish are interspersed all throughout the clip, just so you won’t miss its disconcerting message. The Amir Shoucri-directed clip isn’t far off from being the prologue to a Korean horror movie where some poor sap falls for Seo’s pretty face, then ends up wondering why she smells even though she showers all the time. “Honeysuckle” is off Xiu Xiu’s February release Always. The title of the track that follows it is “I Luv Abortion.” Let’s hope they don’t make a video for that one.

Presenting a day in the life of bandmember Angela Seo.

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April 12, 2012

As individuals, designers Cozette McCreery, Joe Bates and Sid Bryan have worked with the likes of of McQueen and Lanvin, as a trio, the designers started the colorful menswear brand Sibling. Not long after, the designers, hungry for even more color in the world, launched Sister, Sibling’s pun-intended womenswear line. For both lines, the designers take traditional knitwear shapes and forms and add an irreverent twist, like a tongue-in-cheek skull intarsia,  or a bold leopard print on a crisp twinset. We caught up with the trio between showings of their latest Sibling collection while the trio was in New York to chat their latest designs, Advanced Style, and how color is right for all seasons.

I love the juxtaposition of  Sibling’s wearability with quirky avant-garde details, like the pom-pom masks that walked for AW12. Can you tell me about those masks, and your menswear beginnings?  

Sibling: Well, that’s the genius styling by Katie Grand. We’ve done knit monsters, like, a  total head-to-toe thing for every season we’ve done so far. We’re rooted in knitwear. And one of the joys of designing is setting yourself up for challenges. And that’s why we started off with menswear and knit. The structure of having to be controlled, of all those restrictions, makes us come up with a better product. Necessity is the mother of great invention. It stops us from going off message. Of course, there’s a million things we’d love to do: Ideas are easy. As a trained designer, ideas are the easy part. It’s putting them into a concise collection which is the hard part. It’s one of the joys that we have; we take a very base product—like hair extensions—which are very ordinary and are considered very cheap and throw away by many. For each one, in by hand into a stitch so we have strands and strands of hair and each one is laid into a needle on a machine and stitched in. So each one of those strands of hair is laid in individually. In essence, our signature is to take something very ordinary, in this case, something that’s not a precious material, and make it wondrous.

You’re technicians.

That’s where other brands can’t compete. We’ve got an amazing atelier, we’ve got industrial hand-flap machines so we can make everything in house. Because there are three of us, we each bring a different expertise to the brand. One of those shared experiences is a lifelong love and development of knit. One of our designers, Sid,has created show pieces that are iconic. Many of them have been in exhibitions in New York; in the MOMA, the Met, and F.I.T’s museum.

 Being a design trio, do you find that each of you have different aesthetics?

 Of course, we’re three people – we have different tastes and we bring different things into design. But Sibling and  has it’s own aesthetic look. As a design trio, we understand what that is. That’s how we could adore something and really, really individually love the idea, or even all three of us love the idea of doing something but know that it might not belong with Sibling. It’s less confusing that way, for us and for the consumer. The consumer should start to automatically understand that there is a Sibling look, and where they need to go to find it, rather than it being a different aesthetic every single season. There’s got to be something that connects it all. Also, we always add a sense of humor with tongue-in-cheek design elements. And, of course, there’s always some kind of dark undercurrent to it – but it’s never a serious darkness.

There’s also a really great blend of high and low elements.

One of the absolute constants for us is a reference to street culture, to how the youth of the working class is devoted to certain looks. Sometimes it’s very obvious, other times it’s not so obvious. But the streets are always there, and always on our mood-board. You know, it could be from the 80s, it could be from the 50s, it could from the 30s, but there’s always that reference somewhere.

What I love about your brand is that the pieces feel like something that doesn’t explicitly shout “London.” The Sibling brand definitely feels born out of London , but, I wouldn’t be taken aback if I saw your designs walking down the  streets of New York.

Well, I’ve just been stopped by an old lady in the street who told me I looked adorable. So, it crosses ages, worlds.

It’s Advanced Style!

 That’s a big influence on our collection, actually. One of the key things that was hatched at the very beginning of Sibling was using the iconic twin set as a design foundation, which is, of course, the ultimate “granny-wear.” We really love product like the twin set that’s been around forever, and you’ve seen a million times. It’s still possible to put a new twist on it, and it’s still possible to take it out of context and make it new and fresh.

We love that older people are quite rebellious. They get to that age where, like teenagers, they don’t really give a shit as long as they’re happy and they’re wearing something that makes them smile.

And that’s why I love Advanced Style. Because the subjects on the blog aren’t trying to impress anybody, they’re just being happy.

 It’s wondrous isn’t it? They’re probably more rebellious than the younger people. Because we all – in our hearts, however “individual” and “rebellious” we think we’re being–are in fact conforming to something, when we’re at that age. Whether you were like a “moody Goth” and totally about, “it’s only about me,” you can go to any city in the world and you’ll find identical moody Goths.

So, where can we find your brand stateside?

We sell at Treasure & Bond on West Broadway, near Grand. They have a great Sister window display right now.

You’re all about color, and it’s refreshing. New York is basically black-on-black ensembles year round.

I think it’s the same worldwide.  We were on holiday together, and images from the menswear shows were coming out and we were sitting  around moaning about them. They were so shockingly dull. I mean, some of the stuff is beautiful, don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying it’s all awful. But it was dull.  There’s only so many grey outfits – and you know, when you look at show after show, at Milan, and Paris, and New York, and so much grey and black and white and navy. It’s because the stores have to be careful. A buyer’s job is really scary. But that’s shifting. I’ve been talking to buyers, especially in Paris, and they’re quite vocal about the fact that costumers are now buying color.
Color definitely popped up on the runways with bold prints.

I agree. I think that the prints trend came out of the same place that bore our desire to put lots of color in our collection. You have to offer some level of choice. And it’s a plus if you ever go to parties. Recently, at one event I was wearing the Sibling candy-leopard, and I was the only one getting photographed because everybody else was in black, and blue and grey. It’s time to cheer up a bit.

 

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March 15, 2012
Photography by Alis Pelleschi; Styling by Alexis Knox
Photography by Alis Pelleschi; Styling by Alexis Knox

Charli XCX‘s debut EP is scheduled for release this spring, but she’s crashing the party in Austin this week, giving SXSW crowds an idea of what they can expect. “It’s finished and I’m really excited about it because I’ve been working on it since I got signed to Atlantic records four years ago,” she says of the still-untitled record. And just to emphasize how damn excited everyone is about this 19-year-old Londoner and her brooding, synth-laced music, she was handed one of the most coveted slots at the entire festival, following Fiona Apple’s set at tonight’s Pitchfork showcase at the Central Presbyterian Church. We spoke to her a few months ago about her guiltiest pleasure, first love, and that time she went to a rave with her parents.

How’s it going?

It’s going really great. I’m having a chill afternoon.

I’ve played your latest single with Balam Acab, “Nuclear Seasons’”on repeat.

I wrote “Seasons” last summer in L.A. I wanted to make this beautiful yet sort of decaying song.

Tell me about your debut album. 

The album is finished and I’m really excited about it because I’ve been working on it for quite a long time now. I’m just ready for everyone to hear it. The album has a definite duality, there are some parts that are definitely more pop, where other parts are darker, moodier, and a bit more mysterious. The album is like two sides of my personality.

Do you remember the the first time you rebelled against your parents?

When I was 14, I started going to these underground warehouse parties in London. One night, my parents actually wanted to come along. What started out as my attempt at teenage rebellion ended up being a weird family outing to an illegal rave. My dad got offered a bunch of MDMA, but he’s got really bad hearing, so he thought that the guy said MDF, which is a word that you use for flooring. So my dad was like, ‘Yeah great! I’ll get loads of it!’ My dad thought he was buying laminate flooring, but instead he was unknowingly becoming a drug lord. It was kind of a weird night.

Did they have fun?

Yeah, they loved it and were really into it.

You’re dad really supports the music you’re making.

I mean it’s never been a kind of state school brat experience, but my parents believe in me.

What scared you most as a kid?

You know what, this is funny. Wasps. I was also really scared of the girl from The Ring. I couldn’t get videos from the video store because I always thought that I was going to get that tape, and then be attacked by the girl. I’d never answer phones in the house I was in because I thought the voice on the other end would say, ‘7 days!’

What’s the first thing or person that you fell in love with?

When I was younger it was probably the Spice Girls, just because I wanted to be them and I thought that their fashion was so awesome—and I still think it is. I also had like really weird attachments to flannels (shirts) which I use to pretend were dragons. To be honest, I was a weird kid.

What is your guiltiest pleasure?

The television show The Hills and, I’m not embarrassed to say that, yeah, I’ll watch Heidi Montag doing her thing. I find her an amazing human being, no, that’s the wrong thing, not amazing, just a fascinating human being to watch on the T.V.

What is the thing you can’t wait for about getting older?

I think I’d be a rad, cool grandma. I’m looking forward to being the weird old lady that still wears platform boots and cotton trousers, I want people on the street to say ‘Oh yeah, that’s the crazy bitch again walking down the street.’

And then finally, what’s one band, film, actor or movement that everyone should know about?

Gabriel Bruce. I’ve literally only heard one song, but I mean it’s amazing and the video is amazing and as a plus, he’s got this Tom Waits-y type voice. His video is him literally dancing like Elvis.

And finally, who would you want to play you in a movie about your life?

Christina Ricci because she is a cool Wednesday Addams.

Styling by Alexis Knox.

Get Obsessed. This and more in the Obsessed issue, out now!

Photography by Alis Pelleschi

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March 1, 2012

American born, British reared Sebastian Sauvé has quite the impressive resumé. From the cover of German L’Officiel Hommes to spreads in GQ and i-D ,among others, this pouty-lipped model is a veritable rising star. In his downtime, the 6’3 Sauvé hacky-sacks and takes photos of his behind-the-scenes catwalk experiences. Check out the latest stills from his recent travels.

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February 22, 2012
Flower hat: Ashley Lloyd
(left) Coat and Trousers: Hougton, (right) Black dress: Abigail Stewart, Dot dress: Houghton, Paper ruff: stylists own
Jacket and Blouse: Reformation, Bow tie: Wuyouk, Skirt: Egg Cream, Shoes: Galliano
Headpiece: Nailah Lymus, Vest: Dominic Louis
(left) Dress: With & Wessel, Coat: TopShop shoes, A Détacher hat: stylists own (right) Cardigan: A Détacher, Dress: Reformation, Sandals: A Détacher
(left) Coat and Trousers: Hougton, (right) Vest: Dominic Louis, Pants: Houghton
Gown: Galliano, Suspender belt: A Détacher
Vest and Pants: Park Choon Moo shoes, A Détacher  top hat: stylists own
Blouse: Reformation pants, A Détacher shoes: TopShop
Flower hat: Ashley Lloyd
(left) Coat and Trousers: Hougton, (right) Black dress: Abigail Stewart, Dot dress: Houghton, Paper ruff: stylists own
Jacket and Blouse: Reformation, Bow tie: Wuyouk, Skirt: Egg Cream, Shoes: Galliano
Headpiece: Nailah Lymus, Vest: Dominic Louis
(left) Dress: With & Wessel, Coat: TopShop shoes, A Détacher hat: stylists own (right) Cardigan: A Détacher, Dress: Reformation, Sandals: A Détacher
(left) Coat and Trousers: Hougton, (right) Vest: Dominic Louis, Pants: Houghton
Gown: Galliano, Suspender belt: A Détacher
Vest and Pants: Park Choon Moo shoes, A Détacher top hat: stylists own
Blouse: Reformation pants, A Détacher shoes: TopShop

Photographers Ned and Aya Rosen 

Stylist Niki Hall 

Hairstylist Michiko Boorberg using Bumble and Bumble (michikoboorberg.com)

Makeup Artist Agata using MAC

Model Caroline Dahm from MUSE 

Photography by Ned and Aya

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February 21, 2012

BULLETT: What shows were your favorite?

MAREN HARTMAN: I just watched Honor and it was really fantastic! I thought it continued the whole lady-like thing but then mixed it up with a very 60’s masculine feel. From the prints to the shoes, everything was really on point.

Are there any kinds of trends that we should look forward to?

I think that we will definitely see a continued return to dark romanticism, especially the pseudo-gothic-western trend that Nicholas K showed so well. As far as the overall mood, we’ve definitely seen many non-print prints, like photo-reel prints, and vapor, almost ombre-like details that we saw on men’s runway in Europe and now that trend is filtering it’s way in over here. Another trend that we’ll be seeing is the pairing of print-on-print , WGSN is calling it “wall paper dressing.”

New York Fashion Week is still eating up the heritage trend.

Yes, and what I love about the heritage trend is there is this whole element of classic color. When we think of fall it typically means washed-out navies, burgundy’s, camel, and light creams, but what’s been great is that designers are utilizing those tried and true classic heritage-based colors and then incorporating bright, vibrant pops of color.

Steven Alan did that with a pair tomato red pants.

Exactly! This also fits in line with the mindset of the consumer–because at the same time we’ve got to sell clothes, you know? Many designers have made their lines retail-ready and I think everyone is kind of jumping on that bandwagon. Additionally, something else we’re all very excited about is the fact that the silhouettes are really moving in a classic direction: Whether it’s a basic shift, or it’s a pencil skirt, or a simple trouser, the pieces are all very classic and wearable and yet still special at the same time because of the print usage and the fabrication. Add some color blocking and fabric blocking and that’s where the newness comes in.

What are the colors will make an appearance during fashion week?

Well, there’s fabric mixing with tweeds and warm casted neutrals, which is really nice. Camel is always such a go-to color season after season, however, this season there is something really lovely about the levels of creams and camels that we’ve seen so far. Going forward, there’s going to be a moodier, much more rich fabrication paired with pops of color which really bring the element of color full circle. Another thing we’re really excited about is the very sellable idea of neutrals coupled with color. I love that element of brightness and color that we’ve been seeing on all of the runways for a while now, and I can’t wait to see it played out in a fall way so that it doesn’t look like crayola Skittles!

You’ve mentioned the word ‘sellability’ a lot, can you talk about how New York Fashion Week plays into that idea?

That’s something that I absolutely love about New York, because at the end of the day if we looked just like Paris and Milan then it would be a whole bunch of really forward pieces. There has to be that yin-yang to what’s going on in all of the different countries. I always say it’s much harder to re-invent the wheel than to just come up with newness every season. Newness you can pull out of anything, but to re-invent the classics is the real task and I think that’s what New York specializes in especially for the US market.

What else can we look forward to?

The pattern work is going to be really great, especially wallpaper patterning. We’re seeing three blocks: classic heritage colors, the dark romantic moodier colors in levels of burgundy, levels of greens, levels of black, and, then, finally winter pastels and winter whites will be a great juxtaposition to it all.

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