Film & TV

Watch the SAG Awards Winners Denounce Trump

Film & TV

Watch the SAG Awards Winners Denounce Trump

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Celebrities, man. They should totally stick to acting, right? Unless, you know, there’s a very real crisis going on with a madman hellbent on driving our democracy into the ravine. Many of them chose the latter course last night at the Screen Actors Guild Awards, laying into President Trump’s illegal, immoral, and inconceivable attempt to bar entry into the United States on the basis of religion.

 

Most notable among the nights speeches was one from Mahershala Ali, this year’s breakout star, from Moonlight.

He talked about finding common ground despite minor differences we might each have:

“When we get caught up in the minutiae, the details that make us all different, there’s two ways of seeing that. You can see the texture of that person, the qualities that make them unique, or you can go to war about it, say, ‘That person is different from me, I don’t like you, so let’s battle.’ My mother is an ordained minister, I’m a Muslim. She didn’t do backflips when I called her to tell her I converted 17 years ago. But I tell you now, we put things to the side, I’m able to see her, she’s able to see me, we love each other, the love has grown. That stuff is minutiae. It’s not that important.”

Stranger Things‘ David Harbour was a bit more pugnacious.

Punch more Nazis, he said.

“This award from you, who take your craft seriously and earnestly believe, like me, that great acting can change the world, is a call to arms from our fellow craftsmen and women, to go deeper, and through our art to battle against fear, self-centeredness and exclusivity, and through our craft to cultivate a more empathetic and understanding society by revealing intimate truths that serve as a forceful reminder to folks that when they feel broken, and afraid, and tired, they are not alone. We are united, in that we are all human beings, and we are all together on his horrible, painful, joyous, exciting and mysterious ride that is being alive. Now, as we act in the continuing narrative of Stranger Things, we 1983 Midwesterners will repel bullies, we will shelter freaks and outcasts, those who have no home, we will get past the lies, we will hunt monsters, and when we are at a loss amidst the hypocrisy and the casual violence of certain individuals and institutions, we will, as per chief Jim Hopper, punch some people in the face when they seek to destroy the meek and the disenfranchised and the marginalized.”