Culture

The Language We Use On Twitter Defines Our Personal Brands

Culture

The Language We Use On Twitter Defines Our Personal Brands

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A study done by EPJ Data Science, which I admittedly let my subscription to run out a few months back, breaks down how we use certain styles of communication on Twitter, and how that helps us identify with our specific internet tribes. The study, “Word usage mirrors community structure in the online social network Twitter”,  which you can read here, although good luck figuring out what Z=μc−μgσg/Nc√ means, finds that “the network emerging from user communication can be structured into a hierarchy of communities, and that the frequencies of words used within those communities closely replicate this pattern. Consequently, communities can be characterised by their most significantly used words. The words used by an individual user, in turn, can be used to predict the community of which that user is a member.”

In other words, if you useeeee reaalllly lonngg words like thisssss, then you’re probably a Justin Bieber fan. Also an idiot. That last part is sort of my own reading of the data, however, so don’t take it as science.

Professor Vincent Jansen from Royal Holloway told Phys.org, “Interestingly, just as people have varying regional accents, we also found that communities would misspell words in different ways. The Justin Bieber fans have a habit of ending words in ‘ee’, as in ‘pleasee’, while school teachers tend to use long words.” (via Media Bistro)

This graphic above, which has to be the least effective illustration of data I’m actually interested in I’ve ever seen, shows the top words used by certain tribes, or what I like to call “personal brands,” which puts me in my own sort of tribe, namely, people who overuse the phrase “personal brand” on Twitter in order to distance ourselves from the horror of conformity and meaninglessness of contemporary communication.