Art & Design

The Brooklyn Museum to Launch a Year of Feminist-Focused Exhibitions

Art & Design

The Brooklyn Museum to Launch a Year of Feminist-Focused Exhibitions

'Blue Poles,' Marilyn Minter, 2007
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Beginning this fall, The Brooklyn Museum is launching a series, titled A Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism at the Brooklyn Museum, featuring 10 exhibitions to mark the 10th anniversary of the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art.

The year-long project “presents a multiplicity of voices from the history of feminism and feminist art,” in order to recognize feminism as “a driving force for progressive change.” The museum’s goal is to take the “transformative contributions of feminist art during the last half-century,” and reimagine “the next steps, expanding feminist thinking from its roots in the struggle for gender parity to embrace broader social justice issues of tolerance, inclusion and diversity.”

A Year of Yes will also examine the museum’s history, and demonstrate the way feminism effects art, culture and our collective history: “The Brooklyn Museum is uniquely positioned to work from its broad historical holdings to lead vital conversations about how feminism must contribute to the urgent international dialogue about human rights,” said Museum Director Anne Pasternak. “Art is more than something to stand in awe of and ponder. It tells us about ourselves and our past, and art leads to cultural change.”


Faith Ringgold_Self portrait

Early Works #25, Faith Ringgold, 1965


The program will commence with the most comprehensive examination of artist Beverly Buchanan to date, and ends with A Feminist Timeline, the last of 10 distinct exhibitions that explore the history of the Brooklyn Museum from a feminist perspective. Other events include a Marilyn Minter exhibition, another focused on showcasing the work of black female artists including Emma Amos, Faith Ringgold, Julie Dash and Betye Saar, and Iggy Pop Life Class, an opportunity for students to learn from Turner Prize-winning artist, Jeremy Deller, as he examines “shifting cultural readings” of the nude male body, using punk rock legend Iggy Pop as a real-life model.

Despite years of being forcefully written out of culture and art history, women have used feminism to make an indelible mark. Using feminist history as a starting point, A Year of Yes will not only reinforce the important role feminism has played in shaping modern culture, but also encourage a dialogue about the future of the movement.


A Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism at The Brooklyn Museum will be on view this fall, until October 2017. Check here for information about the events.