Fashion

The Best From NYFW Day 4: Posen, DKNY, Lam Bask in Americana

Fashion

The Best From NYFW Day 4: Posen, DKNY, Lam Bask in Americana

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Many, many, many more hours to go, we wanna be coordinated. In retrospect—actually, never having lived through the times—I can look back and be like 1980s power-suit-dressing was all about women’s dominating the workplace, Margaret Thatcher, Working Girl… Was it that simple? Suits, especially pantsuits, are back. What does that mean? It means fashion brokers are making, selling, and buying pantsuits; styling them in editorials and telling me “the pantsuit is back!” But it’s not just pantsuits—we’re seeing all varieties of professional coordinates. Like, all-over-print tops and bottoms, monotonal simple separates, clothes that are effortlessly put together and professional but not just masculine-borrowing, business-exec professional. What this signifies, if anything, about the times I’m not sure (something about post-post-feminism and embodying power, not just putting it on?). I like it because I’m lazy.

Derek Lam
You had me at mustard madras. The Derek Lam professional woman works in art. Maybe she’s a wine exporter, maybe she’s Michelle Obama. Actually, she can be anything she wants, because she’s American. That’s what we’re hearing in the reviews, anyway. Spring 2013 is all about Americana, sportswear, workwear, tradition, craftsmanship. Associations aside, the clothes were (and this is fashion’s top backhanded compliment) highstreet knockoff-able: simple but distinct, trendy but accessible. Derek Lam did a great job and you’ll be seeing it at your local Zara soon.

 

DKNY
Biggie Smalls soundtracked. The backdrop was a blurred cityscape in black and white with a yellow streak of cab. NY emphasized. Ballcaps over blazers, crop top coordinates—the Bullett office girl could definitely flaunt such professional athletica (or is it athletic professionalism?). The closing camouflage print was asphalt toned for the urban warrior—can’t you just feel the creative process?—in the concrete jungle of DK’s NY.

 

Diane Von Furstenberg
In the 1970s, Diane Von Furstenberg gave women a professional uniform in the wrap dress. Her brand has been, rightly, aging with her, and these days the wrap dresses fall away from the body, not clinging to it; the 9-5 girl is retired and resorting. Palazzo was the theme— palazzo and other vague ethnic bohemia that, at this point, only signifies the ‘ethnic bohemia’ of fashion speak. Maybe we’re just warming up to irony again, but there was something appealing about the idea of a pretty young thing stomping around the city in Balenciaga creepers and these Advanced Style ensembles.

 

Zac Posen
Glamour, glamour, glamour, glamour. And who better to open than Naomi Campbell? Well, maybe Mykki Blanco, but we’ll have to wait for London FW for fun like that. Posen has presented a collection that, even if it’s not your style, is hard not to croon over. This is the age of the croon he’s channeling after all. “Moonlight Serenade” played in the background at Zac Posen, as models glided forth in ‘40s suit looks and gowns a sidewalk wide in tulle. Kudos on the black model representation. Now that is Americana.