Culture

Why Is A Texan Cheerleader Slaughtering Animals in Africa?

Culture

Why Is A Texan Cheerleader Slaughtering Animals in Africa?

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Whether you’re a carnivore, pescetarian, vegetarian, vegan or restrict yourself to any other sort of diet, we can all agree on one thing: Kendall Jones has one of the worst imaginable hobbies. The 19-year-old Texan cheerleader flies to South Africa not just to visit or go on safaris, but instead she hunts down exotic animals, poses with their carcasses, and then posts those pics to Facebook, all under the façade of animal conservancy.

In one post from June 19, Jones sits next to a dead white springbok and writes, “Another harvest for today…White springbok, it’s 1 of the 4 color shades of this animal! And let me tell you it’s one of my favorite kinds of meat so far!”Although springbok are considered one of the few antelope species to be expanding in population, the International Union Conservation of Nature considers other victims of her hobby to be vulnerable and near threatened.

In an incredibly artful collage, Jones proudly poses next to a lion, leopard, white rhino, hippo, and Cape buffalo. Another photograph proves she killed an elephant, meaning that Jones successfully targeted and brought down the five most difficult animals to kill in Africa. Amongst big-game hunters, this is referred to as the Big Five Game and hunters pay upwards of $10,000 for just one opportunity to hunt one of the five animals.

Of course, Jones claims that she’s helping humanity through her hunting efforts: “Without the financial resources provided by hunters to protect habitat and stop poachers, there would be no infrastructure of wildlife management,” she wrote earlier today. At the end of June she also posted a video with the caption, “Just a little video to show how exciting these villagers were to get some elephant meat and protein!” A better caption may have been: inhumane slaughter occurs in remote African village after a hunter brings back elephant carcass.

Believe what you want about her conservancy efforts, but we’re not buying it, and we’re not the only ones. In under a week, two online petitions—one to ban her Facebook posts and another to ban her from hunting in Africa entirely— have garnered over 140,000 and 40,000 signatures. If she continues hunting under her this façade, she could at least stop showing off her kills. Cheetahs use Facebook, too.