Culture

Somehow, 42% of Americans Still Think the Iraq War Wasn’t a Mistake

Culture

Somehow, 42% of Americans Still Think the Iraq War Wasn’t a Mistake

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The bungled evidence, billions of wasted dollars and thousands of deaths—American and Iraqi alike—have apparently done nothing to convince a very stubborn chunk of the country that the war in Iraq was a bad idea, as a Gallup poll taken on the 10 year anniversary of the occupation shows that 42% of Americans still think it was a good move to get involved. While once hawkish pundits like Ezra Klein and Jonathan Chait have penned sheepish apologies for their initial positions supporting the war, those Americans have seen nothing to be learned from literally everything we’ve found out in the years since about why tackling Iraq was a stupid idea—the difficulty of managing a transition, the shoddy intelligence justified by war-hungry bureaucrats, the lack of an exit plan—though at least it’s much lower than the 75% who were originally in favor back in 2003. (For the record, I was 14 and more interested in saving up the money to buy a Gamecube. So I don’t think I had any position.) It’s eerier when you consider the number hasn’t changed much over the last few years, which suggests attitudes are beginning to calcify in spite of all the emerging data about the war’s fucked-uppedness. The poll suggests that it’s mostly Republicans who haven’t changed their point of view—and that 45% of them still think it was a good idea to get involved in Vietnam. You can’t ever win, maybe.