Culture

Smart Reads: Ellis Island, Judith Butler, and Gabrielle Bell

Culture

Smart Reads: Ellis Island, Judith Butler, and Gabrielle Bell

+

Today in culture: Love in Waffle Houses, graphic weirdness, and Judith Butler.

-“If they were to let us behind the counter we could pretend that we were in my kitchen fishing for spatulas in wooden drawers: you know, the one with the loose handle—I know you have one just like it where you live, yet my grandmother has always said that a donkey is smarter in his own house than a genius is in someone else’s.” From Brian Oliu’s “Taking Someone to a Waffle House After the Bars Close.”

-“God knows I didn’t have anything new in mind, much less anything literary, when I took my first newspaper job. I had a fierce and unnatural craving for something else entirely.” Tom Wolfe’s “The Birth of the New Journalism” and other essays.

-“If not knowing whether to call a work realist or fabulist could make it count as slipstream, could that qualify it as fantastical? Could it, as Stephen Graham-Jones claims for the Weird, “destabilize your perception of the world”?” On Fabien Vehlmann and Gwen de Bonneval’s The Last Days of an Immortal.

-Life magazine photos of Ellis Island, 1950.

-See New York change: photos from then and now.

-“I am the one who loses myself here, in this way, under these conditions, who finds the following irresistible; who falls then and there; who wants, who idealizes, who pursues; who cannot forget this or that kind of thing, wants it again, cannot stop wanting it easily; who wants to be pursued, or to become unforgettable, irreplaceable.” Judith Butler on love.

-My reading is kind of haphazard. I’ll read all of the fiction in The New Yorker. I keep rereading Alice Munro. I can’t get over Alice Munro—I’m stuck on her. Like on some sort of loop.” Gabrielle Bell interviewed at the Paris Review Daily.