Culture

Run Kindle run, Apple is after you.

Culture

Run Kindle run, Apple is after you.

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If 2011 marks anything in your traditional book-lover’s collective consciousness, that’s the fear and anxiety brought over by a rapidly-digitalizing publishing industry. The digital anxiety, initiated by the Spring 2010 “power of print” campaign of industry giants such as Condé Nast, Time Inc., and Hearst (let’s be honest, it was no different than to watch the captain jump off the ship); only proved itself right by the liquidation of international book retailer Borders. As those who still had a clinging hope (in other words, gratuitous optimism) gasped for one last breath of air, The Swedish furniture (and what not) monarch IKEA announced that BILLY, their most renowned bookcase had to undergo changes to be able to stay in the market: People no longer bought books. Last but not the least, The Economist declared a merry obituary on the death of conventional publishing in September 2011 and sealed the deal.

As the rumors of Apple’s upcoming mysterious NYC event about iBooks take over, the first days of 2012 seem to ask for a resolution for personal digitalization. Blame the tech-blogosphere if we are wrong; yet the event (details of which are still kept secret) is expected to unveil a number of new features for eBooks, including sound and video aspects that instantly remind us of Harry Potter’s the Daily Prophet . This ain’t no Kindle. This ain’t no NOOK. With a quick glance at the direction of the music industry today, we know that one better behold if there is an Apple involved. For now, we can only hold our breaths and hope that Apple does find a way to make eBooks smell like they came straight from the third floor of Stephen Schwarzman Building.