Art & Design

Polyamory in Paris: Pinar&Viola’s Valley Foretell

Art & Design

Polyamory in Paris: Pinar&Viola’s Valley Foretell

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“With fashion, everything can be accepted,” declared Pinar Demirdaghalf of the creative duo Pinar & Viola. The two graphic designers—respectively Turkish-born and Dutch-bornlaunched their new online platform, Valley Foretell (to reveal future desires) this weekend in Paris. And more specifically: their latest polyamorous-themed image collectionTo celebrate, they hosted not just any old party. It was a polyamorous wedding party, or festivity of “l’amour au pluriel.”

Pinar deems polyamory representative of the contemporary way in which we engage in relationships. (The duo’s previous project revolved around political sexual scandal, depicting girls taking selfies and leery politicians on terrycloth towels. Themes of taboo obviously preoccupy them.) Fittingly, the event was hosted on Gay Pride day: perfect timing to champion broadmindedness and variety and alternative relationships

With this is mind, Pinar & Viola created digitally painted images of people in long-term polyamorous relations, set against still life backgrounds. Five images were transposed onto Limoges porcelain plates, mixing the tradition of royalty dinnerware with a progressive attitude towards sex and loveThe various visual cues included Bali, Mondrian, gardening, clowns, roses, ladybugs, the moon.

Guests were invited to witness a polyamorous union in a stunning classically-Parisian apartment—wood parquet floors, moldings on ceiling, floor-to-ceiling windows leading to wrought iron balcony, marble fireplace. There were glasses of champagne, and Aperol cocktails; candles flickered in emptied glass jarsthere were vases of fresh flowers, and white tulle was strung around.People mingled about until the ceremony began with a gong. Incense was waved liberally.

The mistress of ceremonies wore a red dress, and proceeded to “wed” Elodie, Manuel, and Jean Eduard. The trio, who have lived together for four years, made declarations, one solemnly vowing not to monopolize the TV. The mistress of ceremonies asked if anyone opposed the union, but no one did, so she waved some roses about at the trio, declared “I bless you” and repeated “may light, purity, and truth reign.” The trio each tied on paper rings, and kissed each other individually and as a triumvirate.

Rice was thrown joyously from the crowd. In lieu of a bouquet, they tossed triangle crown fashioned out of sticks and baby’s breath. The mistress of ceremonies implored god to protect the three lovers, and voilà: it was matrimony and multiplicity. As requisite at all wedding receptions, a frosted layer cake was wheeled out. Symbolically enough, it had three layers, and was topped with three birds.