Fashion

Paris Fashion Week Day 4: Dior, Chalayan, & Margiela

Fashion

Paris Fashion Week Day 4: Dior, Chalayan, & Margiela

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Yesterday in Paris, models topped with Garth bang toupees bopped to Iggy Pop at Yohji Yamamoto; Roland Mouret showed us the biggest shoulders and we liked it; and Isabel Marant flirted with her LA customer (pretty but we prefer when she flaunts her French). And then there were the majors:


Christian Dior
Christian Dior—the founder, the man—ran his house for only a decade. He died young, in 1957, leaving behind a business that would be upheld for five and a half more decades, which brings us to now. Christian Dior has been designed by Yves Saint Laurent, Marc Bohan, Gianfranco Ferré, John Galliano, and, as of this year, Raf Simons. The pressure couldn’t have been more forceful, weighted by our bated breath. We should have remembered that the trick to getting off is relaxed, rhythmic respiration. Anticipation is bound to disappointment and after the images went live, the twittering resounded with negatives and apologies. Remember fickle internet, this house is over six decades in the making, Raf deserves more than two seasons chance. The collection: some said all over the place, I’d say varied, manifold, contemporary. Dior classics, like the Bar hourglass silhouette, were cropped mini and luminescent in organza. Breath in the beauty of a simple black shell with a broad orange floral skirt that shimmers aflame. Be Here Now.


Chalayan
Hussein Chalayan is a museum entry designer whose most unwearable clothes—the wood circle skirt that transforms into a coffee table, the robotic dress made from aircraft metals and tulle, the jacket with an inflatable travel pillow collar—are showpieces in a career-long project of humanizing fashion. You may not be able to sit in that table skirt, but see how it realigns you with the world around. Much of fashion is about fantasy, about shaping ourselves into some ideal we’ve shaped in the first place. Chalayan challenges the comforts of fantasy and asserts our bodies’ connections to culture, to technology, and the material of the everyday. Chalayan is Hussein’s watered-down line: the clothes are more wearable, the conceptualism more relaxed. This season, with a proclaimed carpe diem theme, Chalayan presented boxy jackets and true column dresses that, through trompe l’oeil coloring and other finesse, did not look like mere rectangles of cloth. A colorful print was sampled from an image of a bundle of clothes on the floor. Seize the everyday.


Maison Martin Margiela
The Margiela house team reassured this season with familiar fabrics from the days when their anonymous leader once led and cocooning dresses that recalled the comforts of bed. From the house that brought us the duvet coat, comes the Snuggie gown: a gloved, floor-grazing cape dress in consciousness-calming pale blue. The oversized t-shirt dress was more bedsheet than t-shirt; it called for you to slip between its skirt and lay with the model horizontal. There were also nine-t0-five and evening looks in the Maison’s signature clever minimalism: two-piece suits with Caucasian-nude undershirts, a one shouldered top looked like a rectangle of taffeta knotted across the ribcage.