Culture

Our Two Spring Covers Engage in the Lana Del Rey SNL Debate

Culture

Our Two Spring Covers Engage in the Lana Del Rey SNL Debate

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By now we’re all well aware of the mishigas surrounding Lana Del Rey‘s much maligned performance on SNL last week. But perhaps there’s something you weren’t aware of: the BULLETT connection. Luckily we at the office have been working with Holmesian steadfastness to piece together the puzzle of connections between three of our featured artists.

THE FACTS:

Summer, 2011

      • Internet sensation Lana Del Rey is discussed at length in conjunction with her viral music videos for “Video Games” and “Blue Jeans.” Fierce conjecture about everything from Del Rey’s business tactics (did she sleep with a producer?) to the authenticity of her lips ensue.

December, 2011

      • Del Rey is covered in the pages of Bullett’s Secret issue, amidst the backdrop of a raging internet debate about the longevity of the viral star.
      • In response to a string live performances, The New York Times reviews Del Rey unfavorably (and condescendingly, surprise Jon Caramanica), hinting at a long-savored belief that what works on web doesn’t necessarily translate to live musicianship.
January, 2012
      • Del Rey performs as the featured musician on an episode of Saturday Night Live, hosted by Bullett Spring issue cover boy Daniel Radcliffe, after which a wild mud-slinging session starts up, headed by various celebrity and blogger tweets. The comment at the forefront of media coverage belongs to Spring issue cover girl Juliette Lewis, who tweeted disparagingly in a knee jerk response which she later revoked, claiming admiration for the artist. On the other side of the spectrum, Daniel Radcliffe defends Del Rey against the vicious attacks which have hounded her since Saturday’s performance, pointing out how totally ridiculous it is to defame Del Rey because of an awkward live show, when everyone knows that all live shows sound pretty much like shit, and if you disagree, that’s because you’re usually too drunk at concerts to even pay attention to the sound quality.
      • He didn’t actually say that–we did. And while we’re at it, we’d like to point out that Del Rey’s ‘awkwardness’ as a live performer is something we understand as being completely–even charmingly–in character. It’s the lack of slickness that confirms her–in the same way that it did for one of her inspirations, Veronica Lake–as someone emblematic of the triumph of the real over the slick.
There you have it–the turn of events in total. But we ask you, is it coincidence that BULLETT’s endorsement should be the thread that connects the three artists together–or is it…?