Fashion

NYFW AW ’15: 2 Chainz at KYE, Pysch Ward at Ammerman Schlösberg

Fashion

NYFW AW ’15: 2 Chainz at KYE, Pysch Ward at Ammerman Schlösberg

KYE
KYE
KYE
KYE
KYE
Ammerman Schlösberg
Ammerman Schlösberg
Ammerman Schlösberg
Ammerman Schlösberg
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KYE         

KYE’s AW ’15 presentation began late, a common occurrence during New York Fashion Week, but this time it was because of an unexpected, tardy culprit: 2 Chainz. We’re not entirely sure why the Georgian rapper was at KYE or attending Fashion Week at all, but when he finally arrived Friday at Pier 59 Studios, a flurry of photographers immediately engulfed the towering emcee with camera flashes. After ensuring that there was sufficient proof of an A-Lister’s presence, the show finally kicked off with a flirty aesthetic that we highly doubt 2 Chainz actually enjoyed.

KYE

This season, streetwear designer Kathleen Kye built upon everyday essentials and offered a maximalist interpretation of each staple. Sprinkled with casino-themed symbols on elongated cardigans, the signature KYE logo branded on pullovers, jewel-encrusted fur coats and school uniform plaids, the collection didn’t take itself too seriously. It was a refreshing, rare approach that almost seemed too cool for the uptight crowd in attendance. Bejeweled hearts were a major motif throughout the spectacle, sewn onto tailored jackets and boxy purses. We can’t imagine what 2 Chainz’ response was to this campy, cutesy element, but it’s always possible Tity Boi has a soft side. Personally, we’d love to see 2 Chainz sporting a blazer with shiny, dainty hearts attached to the sleeves—that’s the look.

Photos by Ashley Jahncke

 

Ammerman Schlösberg

The invitation for Ammerman Schlösberg’s AW ’15 presentation looked like a Hot Topic advertisement that might’ve run on Myspace.com at the height of pop punk, whore trains and mall Goths. Since designer duo Eric Schlösberg and Elizabeth Ammerman have always approached fashion with a playful, at times satirical edge, we knew immediately that this throwback aesthetic was completely intentional.

AS crop

The songs “Dead Bodies Everywhere” by Korn and “Poison in a Pretty Pill” by Crass blared throughout the show, complementing the models’ pale, bloody faces, hospital patches and Lolita-punk apparel. Party balloons read, “Get Well Soon,” creating an environment that almost felt like a psych ward celebration. Crosses, surgical masks, faux fur, visible stitching and a strict color scheme of black and red all seemed to revisit a distant era when anyone who was cool had an online nickname ending with, “XCORE.”

Photos by Dario Castillo