Culture

NSFW Emojis are Finally Here

Culture

NSFW Emojis are Finally Here

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Just last week, TIME published an article with the headline, “People Who Use Emojis Have More Sex.” The study found that “54% of emoji users had sex in 2014 compared to 31% of singles who did not.” Does that speak to our generation? Loads. While we know what happens when you combine your sex and love life with technology (hint: Tinder, Grindr and sexting), there’s something new on the horizon that could mean it’s time to switch those banana and melon emojis for something a little more forward.

Flirtmoji is new way to flirt, tease, suggest, imply or flat out sext just about anyone with a mobile device. It’s a new application that provides users with a straightforward visual language that’s meant to bring a little more pizzazz, or simply- design to your sext life. We asked founders Katy McCarthy and Jeremy Yingling a few questions about Flirtmoji, their love life and the times we’re currently living in.

 

What does it mean to be flirtatious in 2015?

K: I don’t know, it’s only been 2015 for 33 days. I hope that in the future of flirtation it will take on a deeper capacity for honesty and openness.

J: Be a weirdo. There is so much noise today. The best game involves new and strange mating calls.

Does sex only happen physically?

K: Sex in the conventional term implies a physical gesture. I think part of the beauty of conventional sex is the physicality and touch element, although I think intimacy can be conjured non-physically. I think intimacy can take the form of “intercourse” or “discourse.” Something like “feeling sex in our brains.” When we aren’t near the person or people we would have physical sex with, we can engage with them textually or auditorily, this can replace what would otherwise be physical sex. Have I been reading too much art theory? I currently prefer physical sex.

J: Maybe. That certainly sounds enlightened and convenient for today’s hyper-sexual, hyper-dysfunctional culture. It makes sense to narrow it’s definition to singularly physical as a form of security. But it’s also very boring. Sharing skin, fluids, atoms, etc. with another organism is a very complex act—and for me it informs my personality, lifestyle, politics, social life—and is a major vehicle for self-exploration. And this says nothing of emotional, cosmic, soulful planes.

Which Flirtmojis have proven the most controversial?

K: Booty Call got some attention. Which we address in a blog post here. Otherwise the response has been startlingly positive. I feel like we’re more critical of ourselves than the outside world has been.

J: Gerbil in a Condom has received several emails that bring up good points about animals being unable to give consent. In response, we’ve pointed out that the gerbil isn’t having sex. It’s in a condom, not inside of an orifice. Plus, we feel that representing the diverse and bizarre (and controversial and possibly mythical) fetishes of our culture is not an endorsement of them. Our goal is to provide language, and in this case our gerbil friend can be a symbol of weird AND safe sex, of non-consent, or just a humorous way of bringing up that you really liked the last time your partner had their fingers in your ass.

In your eyes, what have been the best advances in sex and technology?

K: Birth control, even though I think it still needs improvement. Also, a thing I’ve recently read about where you can support talented, amateur porn creators by buying them film equipment, toys, etc., through their Amazon wish lists.

J: I haven’t let technology into my sex life and have very little interest in doing so. Other than using it to facilitate many of the orgasms in my life, from finding girlfriends to porn.

Are you single? Why, or why not?

K: I’m in love with everyone.

J: That’s none of the Internet’s business.

Tell us, what’s on your “music to have sex to” playlist?

K: I haven’t put on music for sex in a while. I can’t love and DJ concurrently.

J: PJ Harvey. Or some lesser known phenom songwriters like Mikayla McVey and Rebecca Marcyes.

What’s your perfect Valentine’s Day date?

K: It’s my little brother’s birthday so really I’d like to be kicking it with him, climbing a mountain or something.

J: Last year I spent the day with mom in San Francisco, combing the beach at Lands End, looking for seashells to give out to possible sweethearts at a Valentines party. Pretty perfect day.

Do you believe in the power of aphrodisiacs?

K: Yeah but I don’t want to limit it to stuff you have to consume. And I think they can be contextual. Snow, chalky hands, arguments, sobriety, citrus…

J: Yes, although I think maybe culture and scientists have overstated the power of some. Most of the traditional ones don’t get me going, although sweat does. Armpits are a traditional aphrodisiac, right? Is everyone in agreement that well-earned stink is an aphrodisiac yet? What about avocadoes?

Describe the creative process when designing a new Flirtmoji.

J: First, we brainstorm on a theme or topic (like V-day). We list out the obvious ones (cupid), then riff for a while, get weird (cupid with a strap-on?). Then we divvy them up between K and I based on our strengths or interests, and dive into drawing. After that, we kick back and forth the art files, tweaking, refining, feedback-ing, until we feel we have a strong set. It’s hugely collaborative, hugely investigative.

K: Yes (above). It is beautiful and intense and we take it seriously.

What are your top three personal favorite Emojis?

K: To be completely honest, I rarely send standard unicode Emojis now. I prefer the challenge of using Flirtmoji to better understand this language we’ve created. Or other keyboard extensions with art made by artists. That’s what’s up.

J: My phone can’t see emoji.