Fashion

Moschino Collaborates with Gilbert & George for Agitprop Fall ’16 Collection

Fashion

Moschino Collaborates with Gilbert & George for Agitprop Fall ’16 Collection

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Moschino Creative Director Jeremy Scott designs for fashion’s digital age, when runway looks are immediately plastered across social media before the model can even return backstage for an outfit change. Instagrammers are endlessly scrolling, but merely scanning, so it takes a strategic eye like Scott’s to make that index finger briefly pause, double tap and actually process the image at hand. He’s a devoted fan of color, camp and pop, this trio teaming up each season to create a lineup that’s difficult to ignore. Fall ’16 was no exception to Scott’s recipe—a supersaturated experience, starring prints by British agitprop artists Gilbert & George.

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The London presentation took place in a chapel, inevitably echoing the energy of Manhattan’s iconic Limelight nightclub, where ecstasy and Michael Alig were both early ’90s staples. Reality was twisted when ravey outfits emerged looking as if they were lifted from a cartoon, this approach directly feeding Scott’s mission to captivate an audience without delay. There’s nothing overwrought about his ethos—a signature aesthetic that favors immediate gratification, much like sugar or pornography.

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It’s no wonder he engaged Gilbert & George, a collaborative pair whose practice centers on propaganda and brightly hued, graphic art. The two allowed Scott to splice in archival work throughout his collection; supersaturated faces were stamped across pullovers and hoodies; technicolor crosses decorated bomber jackets and backpacks. Beyond the wildly patterned, technicolor surface, Moschino’s silhouettes for fall boasted a hard militaristic edge, catering toward a confrontational client.

Lucky Blue Smith, the year’s most coveted male model, opened and closed the show—an obvious casting choice for the designer who relishes in all things fame culture. Every angle of Moschino has been imbued with a Warholian sensibility ever since longtime “Creative Witness” Rossella Jardini stepped down in 2013. Scott embraces the power of contemporary fashion, consciously acknowledging intersectionality between dress, music, art, religion, sex and politics, bringing these together for a product that’s designed to be widely consumed.

 

“Fates” by Gilbert & George (2005) 

Innovation can be found in his ideas, not the visible manifestation of garments. Just as Warhol’s perspective was distilled into mass produced, screen-printed canvases that pleased the untrained eye, a single Moschino show is palatable for the mainstream audience, but informed by a dense cultural encyclopedia by which Scott masterfully navigates. It’s intricacy disguised as simplicity—density refined for the surface level shopper. Watch the presentation, below: