Art & Design

‘Look At This Pussy’ Creators Talk Censorship, Feminism

Art & Design

‘Look At This Pussy’ Creators Talk Censorship, Feminism

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Photography: Paley Fairman
Styling: Keyla Marquez
Makeup: Meredith Menchel

A seemingly boyish prank account upon first glance, Look At This Pussy (@look_at_this_pusssy) is a feminist haven that’s championing the female anatomy through Instagram. Its creators, LA-based Eva Sealove and Chelsea Jones, are sending a message of “anti-shame” through their visual puns and eloquently crafted captions.

The account’s been rapidly gaining attention, with almost 5,000 followers at press time, so we spoke with Sealove and Jones to learn more about the rising project. Along with a slew of perfectly executed vagina jokes, they offered us their thoughts on censorship, feminism and how they’d describe the perfect pussy.

How did you two meet? 

Eva Sealove: “We met on New Years Eve through a mutual friend, and we’ve been inseparable ever since. We found out that we’re neighbors. We live a street over from one another, so that has been really instrumental.”

Chelsea Jones: “We tried to make a Twitter account called ‘Twitter Bios‘ and that was just really ridiculous off-the-wall examples of somebody’s Twitter bio, like ‘serious and black’ or ‘the coolest kid at Brandeis.’

ES: “Someone would say, ‘dark and full of gang-green,’ and we would say, ‘Twitter bio: dark and full of gang-green.’ It became almost a verbal tick for us, but I don’t know if anyone else understood it.”

CJ: “It was a little too esoteric, so no one really picked up on it. But that was our first foray into parody accounts of any kind.”

What inspired you to make “Look At This Pussy?”

ES: “We started ‘Look At this Pussy’ about nine months ago, about a year into our friendship. We just started texting each other pictures of things that looked like pussies, saying ‘look at this pussy.’ It was as simple and as organic as that. It was sort of like a ‘Where’s Waldo’ game between the two of us, and it just became one of our internal memes in our friendship. We joked about making an Instagram account for it, and then one day one of us actually did.”

How would you describe the project in your own words?

ES: “It’s a visual and textual project. It’s easily about the writing as much as it’s about the visual. We’ve kind of described it as ‘disruption-lite,’ bringing a little disruption to your trip into the internet. It’s our way of inserting ourselves (pussy joke #1) into your daily routine, which can be a bit numbing when you start scrolling through Instagram. Chelsea tweeted something once that I think about all the time, which was something along the lines of ‘between 6 and 6:45 is when I make myself feel bad on Instagram’ and I think that’s really a common experience between females—looking at other girls on Instagram and feeling bad about yourself. Hopefully what we’re doing is helping people to feel a little bit more like they’re connecting with other people and recognizing themselves in a medium where I feel like that’s a bit alien or a bit uninvited.”

CJ: “I think it’s a societal problem. It doesn’t exist only on Instagram. We’re just constantly broken down all the time.”

 

What’s the message you’re trying to send?

ES: “We’re militantly anti-shame, but we’re not really militantly militant with anything else. There’s a sense of fun with an underlying serious tone, that’s hopefully conveyed. I think when you are a female and you walk through this world in a female body, there are things specific to that experience because of the existing power structure. LATP is a comment on that, rather than a sign-waving, furious thing.”

CJ: “I just want to push the message of respecting one another. It’s not about misandry or hating men, it’s just about respecting each other and having fun. Females are tight (pussy joke #2) and you should pay attention to them. I wanted to create a space where people can feel like ‘it’s normal to feel like this’ or ‘it’s normal that I look like this.’ Everything is a pussy and everything about a pussy is beautiful. I don’t want anyone to ever feel shame about that and this is sort of a way for us to drive home that message, and be funny with it too. I think the accounts that are positive, and pro-women are sort-of incredibly serious, and I think people get a little scared of that. I think it’s important with humor to kind of break down that barrier.”

Do you worry about your content being misinterpreted?

ES: “We don’t really worry about it. With our writing, we’re hoping that people read the captions because for us that’s 50% of the project. If you read our writing, it becomes pretty clear what LATP is about, and if we can communicate and convey that positive message to some people, that’s great. If you just look at it and don’t read the captions and just see a lot of visual puns, to me I think that’s also chill. Hopefully some of it will seep in from osmosis but if it doesn’t, then whatever.”

CJ: “I think a large percentage of the people just straight up don’t even read the captions, and they’re just looking at the pictures, which is fine, but even if we’re just getting people to consider that it’s maybe hard to be a woman, then we’ve done our job.”

Talk about your followers.

ES: “Sometime I joke with Chelsea that I feel like one of those pop stars that starts crying and say ‘I just love my fans so much,’ but for the first time in my life I can kind of understand where that comes from. We really do have amazing followers. A lot of people comment and they are getting it; I know they’re getting it. Personally, I love all of our followers equally, but my favorite ones are the huge artists who follow us. We also have some followers that are young girls, like 15,16, who are tagging their friends and commenting. This girl wrote on one of our posts saying, ‘we need to show this to so and so ’cause he has the wrong attitude.’ To me, I don’t think there’s anything vulgar about our account because our message is anti-shame and acceptance of your own body and it makes me really emotional to see girls at that age respond to our content. It’s really hopeful to me, because of how hard it is to grow up as a female and come into your own. There’s also a bunch of dudes who follow us, and that’s also tight (pussy joke #3).”

 

Talk about your haters.

 CJ: “There’s sort of a lot less than I thought we were going to have; we don’t run into it too often. When we do, it’s usually people that don’t understand. This one guy kept calling us perverts, saying, ‘Yo look at these perverts who aren’t getting any pussy,’ just phenomenally missing the point.”

Do you think men could pull of the same thing you’re doing, but with phallic images? Would a “Look At This Dick” account could be successful?

CJ: “I mean what’s the worst thing that could happen about owning a dick? You get a herpe on it? That’s a little mean, but I think women just have a lot more stuff to deal with.”

ES: “Medically or philosophically?”

CJ: “Both.”

ES: “Word.”

CJ: “The dick is just so praised everywhere else, it’s boring.”

Talk about your creative process when captioning.

 CJ: “We sort of adopted our own voice for the account, so we both write them. For me when I’m conceptualizing it, I’ll look at the image and what ever strikes me about it, I’ll take one concept about it and sort of word-cloud it from there and write.”

 ES: “We’ve written about a few different types of pussies. For some of the posts, we’ve created characters out of some of them, like we did a gold lamé pussy that was sort of a disco bitch. Sometimes the posts are very personal and very emotional for me; sometimes I write about something I’m experiencing and I try to universalize it in some way to an experience that hopefully other people can relate to.”

Do you consider yourselves feminists?

ES: “The short answer is ‘yes,’ we both do identify as feminists, but we both also feel that the term is extremely malleable these days and means a lot of different things to a lot of different people, which is probably a positive thing. It’s a slippery slope of semantics that Chelsea and I get lost in sometimes.”

CJ: “If you want to call me a feminist, that’s fine. I’m just a female coming from a female perspective. I think people just slap the word feminist on anything that a woman has to say, if she has anything to say at all—which to me is kind of whack. But overall, we except it. There’s no shame in the title.”

How do you feel about censorship, particularly on Instagram?

ES: “It’s a really slippery slope. We’re loosely allies with ‘Free the Nipple,’ but Instagram is a very strange platform for the very reason that people do feel bad about themselves on it. Its a way for bringing gender messages home in a strong way that feels really personal, especially to young women. Both of us are very pro-selfie as a way of self expression of feeling good about yourself, but there is something about posting nudes on Instagram that makes it a difficult question to answer.”

CJ: “Obviously we want the female body to be supported and it should be represented and respected, but I think things can get pornographic pretty quickly. I wouldn’t want a minor posting their nipple and then some fucking creep looking at it. But I also love nudes. I think the female body is beautiful and I want everyone to be able to express themselves and break down that barrier; it’s complicated.”

Describe the perfect pussy.

CJ: “I think that all pussies are perfect, in being un-perfect. I don’t think the ‘perfect pussy’ really exists. My pussy, your pussy, everybody’s pussy is fucking perfect.”