Art & Design

London’s Frieze Art Fair Draws Big Names, Few Suprises

Art & Design

London’s Frieze Art Fair Draws Big Names, Few Suprises

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This weekend, the Frieze Art Fair in London corralled 173 galleries and over 1,000 of the world’s leading contemporary artists, from Anish Kapoor to Tracey Emin, into the city’s idyllic Regent’s Park. As expected, art lovers and collectors with supersize wallets skipped from booth to booth, basking in big-ticket artworks courtesy of mega-galleries (Gagosian, White CubeLisson) who, unfortunately, played it safe this year. From Philip‐Lorca diCorcia’s grainy, porn-inspired “Untitled (From the Series East of Eden),” to Ai Weiwei‘s mammoth wooden bench, “Map of China,” which was carved from an ancient Buddhist temple, emphasis was decidedly on the side of A-list art stars.

Some of the strongest pieces in the Frieze Art Fair included Nan Goldin’s series of prints of “Dreamlander” Cookie Mueller, and Ryan McGinley‘s recent cross-country photography in the Team Gallery booth. Along with these pieces came more controversial works, such as Jake and Dinos Chapman’s sculpture of a Madonna spitting worms, and the Christian Jankowski and Riva collaboration, “The Finest Art on Water.” Frieze came to an end this Sunday, but the art world’s marathon continues and will move next week into Paris’ Grand Palais for the Foire Internationale d’Art Contemporain (FIAC).

Frieze will decamp to New York for the first time next May, on Randall’s Island Park