Culture

The Krauss-Foer Split: Thousands of Aspiring Lit Power Couples Revert to Didion-Dunne Model

Culture

The Krauss-Foer Split: Thousands of Aspiring Lit Power Couples Revert to Didion-Dunne Model

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They lived the New York literary dream. Million dollar advances. Books–literary novels!–on the bestseller list. Movie deals. Cute babies. A Brooklyn townhouse on the market for $14.5 million, double what they paid for it. But even fairy tales have novelistic endings: Nicole Krauss and Jonathan Safran Foer are finished. Page Six (not Publishers Weekly?) has the exclusive:

 …a rep confirmed that they “split amicably about a year ago.” Foer then bought a Boerum Hill brownstone eight months ago.

Krauss initially stayed in the six-bedroom, 7,670-square-foot townhouse, but has moved out and is living near her ex.

Despite trying, I never understood either of their books. Many of them are written in the unconvincing and even less reliable voices of children. Krauss’ The History of Love? Made it to page 34, and even with the bold title found very little to love. Foer? He was always too show-y and never told me anything interesting. Well, Foer told us all to be vegetarian in the non-fiction diatribe Eating Animals. But philosopher Peter Singer wrote Animal Liberation back in 1975 and made a stronger ethical case for goin’ veg before it was cool.

 

So the crown for greatest living lit couple has been returned to Queen Joan Didion, whose other half, the late King John Gregory Dunne, passed away in 2003. Dunne might be dead, but since he was the subject of the great Didion book and play, The Year of Magical Thinking, she still rules the power lit couple list.

 

Unlike Krauss-Foer, Didion-Dunne created some of the best work of their time. They reported from El Salvador’s civil war together. They wrote the screenplay for Al Pacino’s first star vehicle. They split time between Manhattan and Malibu, not raising a brood in six-bedroom Brooklyn manse. Their novels and non-fiction books and essays were political, all-encompassing works.

 

Krauss-Foer never seemed to leave their huge house, which, in case you’re wondering, had  a “Tiffany stained glass conservatory.” Cool!