Art & Design

‘Keith Haring: The Political Line’ Opens in Paris

Art & Design

‘Keith Haring: The Political Line’ Opens in Paris

Keith Haring: The Political Line, Musee d'Art Moderne (Photo by Francois Durand: Getty Images)
Untitled, 25 août 1983, Collection particulière, Courtesy Enrico Navarra, New York, © Keith Haring Foundation
Untitled, 1982, Collection particulière, © Keith Haring Foundation
Untitled, 1982, Courtesy Keith Haring Foundation et Gladstone Gallery, New York et Bruxelles, © Keith Haring Foundation
Brazil, 1989, Glenstone, © Keith Haring Foundation
Untitled, 1982, BvB collection Genève, © Keith Haring Foundation
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Keith Haring is perhaps the least disputively wonderful figure of all time. Jesus was also pretty rad, or so the story goes, but too much harm has been done in his name for ol’ J.C. to deserve that title. Andy Warhol? Influential, maybe, but also a vampiric exploiter. Mickey Mouse? Racist. Mother Theresa? Anti-choice. John F. Kennedy? Philanderer. Albert Einstein? He just makes most of us feel dumb. Nope, besides Mahatma Gandhi, I can’t think of anyone more deservedly and universally beloved than artist Keith Haring. Generous, gregarious, and accessible—he’s the best.

Good news for the universe: a massive new exhibit of Keith Haring’s work, Keith Haring: The Political Line, opened to the public las Friday at the Musée d’Art Moderne in Paris, in association with Le CENTQUATRE. One of the largest retrospectives of the American artist-activist’s work to date, the exhibition seeks to “bear witness” to the importance of Keith Haring’s work, drawing attention to its optimistic political agenda. The show—halls upon halls of Haring’s signature stroke, including the rarely traveled The Ten Commandmentsis a must see for anyone interested in the work of Keith Haring. And, really, who doesn’t love Keith Haring?

The exhibit runs from April 19th through August 18th, 2013 at the Musée d’Art Moderne and Le CENTQUATRE. Special thanks to the Keith Haring Foundation and Citizens of Humanity, without whom this gift of an exhibit would never have been possible.