Culture

Don’t Make Jennifer Lawrence the Poster Girl for Nude Selfies

Culture

Don’t Make Jennifer Lawrence the Poster Girl for Nude Selfies

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Ever since the wave of hacked celebrity photos crashed onto the Internet on Sunday, Jennifer Lawrence’s face and name has been at the center of it. Even though a gaggle of female celebrities are involved, it is The Hunger Games star who we think of, sympathize with, and defend the most. She’s been the subject of many think pieces (including a great one by our very own Luke O’Neil), with writers imploring you not to look at and share her photos, and not to place the blame on her. Although there are plenty of other famous women hurting right now, it’s Jennifer Lawrence’s name who is making headlines. She’s been singled out. Over the weekend, Lena Dunham posted a series of tweets, imploring people not to look at the hacked photos these women.

Remember, when you look at these pictures you are violating these women again and again. It’s not okay. — Lena Dunham (@lenadunham) September 1, 2014

But in their accompanying article about the tweets, Dazed and Confused‘s headline read, “Lena Dunham: Don’t look at those Jennifer Lawrence nudes.” What about all those other nudes? Is it cool if we look at those, because the women in them–who’ve been equally violated–aren’t as famous or relatable as Lawrence? Dazed also posted an article called “Are your nude selfies safe on the iCloud?”, a guide to keeping your privates private. Their lead image has been ubiquitous since Sunday: it’s Lawrence under the covers, with a come-hither face. I understand that Lawrence is super famous, and her name and image encourage people to click on your article. But does she deserve to be the Internet’s mascot for illicit, grainy, nude photos? Surely, her success as an actress has earned her more than that.