Culture

Dating Culture Is Dead Because Even Miss USA Uses Tinder

Culture

Dating Culture Is Dead Because Even Miss USA Uses Tinder

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Have you ever used Tinder? It’s the dating app version of Hot Or Not, in which Facebook profiles are converted into bare bones pages of interests and photos—emphasis on the latter—for users to flip through by the second, judging whether they think the person they’re looking at is hot enough to do it with. That’s not too dissimilar from the way that a lot of people use more comprehensive sites like OKCupid or Match.com, but without any attempt to hide the inherent superficial nature of judging human beings off a flattened digital representation; there’s something cynical about it, if you’d like to think your Special Someone isn’t just one of several hundred faces you flipped through in 12 minutes. But what other way is there to get a fuck in the 21st century? Through organic interactions between two breathing people who’ve decided, spontaneously and in real-time, that they want to put their mouths on each other? Hell no.

Hence New York magazine’s discovery that Nana Meriwether, Miss USA 2012, has a Tinder account—because even she, a six-foot tall literal beauty queen has a hard time finding a date in action-packed New York City. “Here’s the thing about dating in New York: It doesn’t exist,” she told the Cut. “There’s so much going on in the city, there are so many distractions that people just forget to go on a second date.” And also: “It’s funny — the guys I’ve said yes to have all been like, ‘Are you real?’ I’m like, ‘Yeah, of course.’ Even pageant-title-holders get lonely.” (brb, soul death.) What does it say about where we are when even Miss USA can’t find a non-shitty person to properly ask her out? It means we’re all destined to be horribly alone, forever and always—or maybe it just means it’s hard to find a date when you’re famous because strangers have deemed you the hottest woman in the country, at least for the moment. Something in between, probably. I guess it’s nice to know that even genetic titans have their normal moments, too.