Fashion

Balenciaga’s Pre-Fall Collection Modeled By All-White Cast, Yet Again

Fashion

Balenciaga’s Pre-Fall Collection Modeled By All-White Cast, Yet Again

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If fashion aims to be a reflection of the diverse world, then every detail, no matter how small, must be accounted for so what’s presented by designers consciously transcends clothing and moves the cultural needle forward.

When Balenciaga and Vetements rightfully fell under fire last March for casting all-white runway shows, we all hated Paris-based designer Demna Gvasalia for parading his whites-only policy. But in true fleeting Internet fashion, we collectively lost interest and shifted our immediate anger toward the next trending debate.

Unfortunately, the piercing powers of viral keyboard warriors didn’t sting the Balenciaga camp hard enough, as the fashion house’s pre-fall ’16 collection has been revealed with imagery exclusively starring white models, yet again. (See the full series, here). This is why online social debates must begin having a longer lifespan than at most, one measly week. Longevity and dedication is lacking in today’s fast-paced world.

When ferocious tweets, articles and Facebook statuses finally silence, that’s when higher powers feel they’ve survived the temporary trenches and continue moving forward with their twisted ways.

Balenciaga’s pre-fall collection photos suggest beauty is exclusive to white bodies, only, despite its customer-base being global and representing all races—not just one. Before we can even begin to assess any aesthetic choices made by Balenciaga this season, we must first critically question their casting choices once more, until fashion’s white-washed standards become more balanced.

Otherwise, all this insider conversation of “Vetements versus Balenciaga,” and how pre-fall has the “Gvasalia stamp” despite it being designed before his arrival to the house is ultimately unimportant. Without bodies, fashion is lifeless; without representation, fashion is hollow.

So what’s up, Balenciaga? BULLETT‘s tired of your internalized racism and ignorant casting. The Internet may have quieted its frustrations, but we’re still taking notes and names in ink.


Keep Reading: New Report Reveals Spring ’16 Fashion Campaigns Were 78% White