Fashion

Assembly Designer Greg Armas on Why He Makes Clothes—in New York

Fashion

Assembly Designer Greg Armas on Why He Makes Clothes—in New York

Photography by Dana DeCoursey
Photography by Dana DeCoursey
Photography by Dana DeCoursey
Photography by Dana DeCoursey
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Assembly New York’s chief designer Greg Armas, one of this year’s CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund nominees, talks to Bullett about the inspiration behind his spring collection and what is means to be ‘Made in New York’.

How would you describe the Assembly aesthetic/ethic?
Authoritative minimalism. There is a purist intention with a future-primitive scope.

Why make clothes?
I was making art before for galleries, this feels the same. It’s for other people, a way for me to be loved and to communicate. Clothing is an opportunity to develop a community based on a shared vernacular that is quite esoteric and symbolic.

Why make clothes in New York?
It’s a hands-on experience for me. I have an interest in keeping production domestic as long as it is the most effective solution. So far, we have been able to sew here and maintain a great retail.

What was the inspiration behind your Spring 2013 collection?
Spring ‘13 is a conflict of institution and native living. Ancient folk prints get appropriated by colonialists into new garments. The stark whites of the sahara and light denim hues borrowed from the uniforms of maids and au pairs are formalized and combined into a culturally schizophrenic contrasting mix-matched palette. The strength of women portrayed from both inside and outside an institution… White Africa.

You’ve referred to Dries Van Noten and Ann Demeulemeester as two of your favorite designers. What is it about them?
They’re personal.

If you weren’t making and selling clothes, what do you think you’d be doing?
Making and selling clothes.