Culture

’50 Shades of Grey’ Somehow Boosting Classical Music Listenership

Culture

’50 Shades of Grey’ Somehow Boosting Classical Music Listenership

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50 Shades of Grey is the latest phenomenon geared toward married mothers to sweep the book world, and as such, not a day has passed without some news about the forthcoming film adaptation, or some weird factoid about the novel floating to the surface of the Internet. Today is no exception. According to NPR the classical music charts (lol there are charts for classical music?) have been shaken up recently by the rise of Thomas Sallis’ Spem in Alium. Written in 1570, the piece is a 40-part Renaissance motet for eight choirs of five voices each, according to Wikipedia. What does this have to do with 50 Shades of Grey? Apparently Spem in Alium is what business magnate Christian Grey is listening to the first night that he seduces the young aching-to-be-turnt-out Anastasia Steele.

Naturally, this means fans of the book have been pumping the Sallis piece while they take luxurious bubble baths with candles and rose petals, or something like that. Remember your joy the first time you heard “Do the Hippogriff”? You can easily Google Spem in Alium if you’re curious to hear what it sounds like, but I vastly prefer to imagine that it sounds a lot like Enigma’s “Sadeness – Part I” for reasons that I hope are obvious.